The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

New Electrolux DLX Assistant

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JPSnuffy's picture
JPSnuffy

New Electrolux DLX Assistant

Just got a brand new DLX from Pleasant Hill and made 10 loaves in one shot! Although the loaves did not rise like I wanted (may have been the fact that I let it knead the dough too long or not enought) it was not a terribly disappointing first run. This machine is amazing! My previous machine was a Dimension2000 and while it was out in Utah for repairs (something internal broke which made the gears not turn) I decided to look at some other mixers that might be do better than the D2000. I can only say at this point that I am very happy with my purchase and look forward to many more fresh loaves.

Glenn 

mattie405's picture
mattie405

Hi Glenn, welcome to the greatest bread site around. I too have a Dimension 2000 and tho I love it I was worried about it since the company went out of business, you know........what if something happened to it and I couldn't get repairs, so I too got a DLX last month and I love it too. Makes large amounts of dough and cleans up so easy. I supply bread for my job so some days I have both machines going, plus it comes in handy if I want to do different types of dough at the same time. I made the blueberry cheese braid that Floyd has on the site in the DLX and it came out beautiful, I want to try all the recipies he has on here, I just need to find more time in a day. Where did you find to get your Dimension repaired? It would be handy to know of a place that can do repairs in case I ever need them. Enjoy the site. Mattie

JPSnuffy's picture
JPSnuffy

Mattie maybe you can help me with this or possibly someone else in this forum, but i thought of you since you had a Dimension2000 previously. To answer your question about a repair place for the D2000. We sent ours to:

 

Bruce Crane C/O Kitchen Kneads

725 W. Riverdale Rd.

Ogden, UT 84405

(801)399-3221 or (800)658-8521.

 

He fixed our D2000 for $112.00, it would have cost around $80 but my wife had already taken the mixer apart and shipped only part of the mixer to him and then we ended up having to ship the rest of the mixer and he had to put it all back together which cost us more.

 

My first batch of dough in the DLX didn't rise very much after it was divided and placed into the loaf pans. I let it sit for 20minutes covered with some flour sack towels covering and although it did rise, it wasn't the kind to write home to mom about. This in turn made the finished loaf not very tall. Below are some ideas that I had of what the problem might have been.

 

I placed the warm water in the bowl, then the yeast and let sit for less than a minute, then added the other ingredients before gradually pouring in the freshly ground flour. I then mixed the bread for a total of what appears to be 14minutes ( I say appears to be because I turned the dial to 8 the first time and then when that ran out and the dough wasn't mixed yet i set it for another 6min.) The dough seemed to come out of the bowl looking great, a little on the sticky side but not too sticky. Maybe I mixed it too long? Should I have put all the ingredients in at one time?

It has been a while since I have made bread so maybe I just forgot some special trick I use to do?

Since it has been a while maybe the yeast I use (which has been sitting in the fridge) has lost its potency?

I live in Colorado and maybe it was just a bad bread day?

Glenn

breadnerd's picture
breadnerd

That seems like it might be a bit long for mixing. I usually do about 2 sets of 4-5 minutes with my DLX (with a rest in between, depending on the type of bread). Though I think you said this was a very big batch--10 loaves? So a longer time might be in order in this case.

 

Also, I this time of year I let my shaped loaves rise a good 35-45 minutes if the room is cool, unless they start to get way overproofed (poofy and collapsing) there's no harm in letting that final rise go a looong time.

 

There are so many factors, temp, altitude, flour, yeast. It might be best just to try again and see how it goes--if you keep having trouble you can start being very methodical to narrow down which factor is causing the problem.

JPSnuffy's picture
JPSnuffy

Yes, 10 loaves which is  double the amount I use to make with the D2000, but the DLX handled it like a champ. I am thinking about doing a 5 loaf batch just to see if I get the same results. I agree that there are alot of factors to consider in bread making to come up with a smoking gun on getting a good rise out of my bread, but I just thought Ii would ask anyways. :)

 

Glenn

mattie405's picture
mattie405

Glenn,
First I would buy some new yeast, doesn't cost much and you can save yourself lots of aggravation, just wondering if it's the cause of the low rise. I use Bobs Red Mill that I get in the cold section of the local health food store, although I also use the bulk packs from Sams when the health food place is out. I let my loaves rise longer than you did, although it sounds like you use fresh milled flour which I have never tried and that may have an effect too. I used to use 12 cups of flour in the Dimension and now use a little more in the DLX. I typically set the timer on the DLX all the way and check as it's mixing and can stop it if it looks done before the timer runs out, sometimes when I use the autolyse method of letting the flour soak for awhile I notice my dough comes out quite lumpy and I have to do a lot of hand kneading to get it mixed well, there is no rhyme or reason for this as far I can figure out as I always use the same mix for the dough...........have come to the conclusion that the house is haunted, seriously tho I buy flour in 50 pound bags so it can't be flour from different bags, the only wide variable I can see is the temp in my kitchen which does widely fluctuate. If you are in Colorado you might also be fighting the high altitude and when I lived there years ago I never could figure out how to bake there. This may go against what everybody else here does but I have the best results with the DLX when I place the empty bowl on it ,attach the roller and scraper and turn the machine on then start adding my mix staring with flour (about half) then yeast some gluten, salt, honey or sugar and then start pouring in the water (room temp) as that all starts to come together I slowly add more flour until I get a smooth dough and then let it continue mixing for a few minutes. With the Dimension I used to just dump everything in the stainless bowl and let er rip for the 8 minutes on the timer and pretty much never had a lumpy dough come out of it. I figure I will be able to get to that point with the DLX with practice but I only have the machine almost a month so far. Hope some of this rambling helps..............Mattie

staff of life's picture
staff of life

I too, have an Electrolux that I bought back in October.  In order to get the machine to actually knead the dough, you have to reserve about 1/3 to 1/4 of the flour from the initial kneading.  Once I see that the gluten is well on its way to adequate development, then I add the remainder of the flour.  It's not perfect, but I learned this technique from RLB's The Bread Bible. 

Good Luck!