The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Plan-B

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Franko's picture
Franko

Plan-B

Well I'd hoped to be making Eric Hanner's latest rye bread http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/18867/experimenting-rye as well as one of the levain recipes from Hamelman's book this weekend. I'd wanted to use the 2 new bannetons I'd ordered from TMB last week but it seems they shipped them via the postal service rather than UPS as requested....so I went to Plan B . I wanted some bread for the next day for sandwiches and didn't have the time to do one of the overnight levain builds so I just put something together on the fly. I remembered that I had some 7 grain blend in the cupboard and decided that'd be a good starting point. Quick and easy was what I was going for here so I kept ingredients to a minimum .  I got a nice jump from it , good color and crumb, as well as a remarkably good flavor for the amount of time I gave it. Although I put it together somewhat randomly I did keep a note of the ingredient weights (except the water) just in case it produced a good loaf that was worth making again. I think it did, and I definately will make this one again. The recipe follows for anyone who'd like to try this Plan-B Multigrain loaf. 


Franko


 


Ingredients


7 grain blend      300grams


soaked in enough warm water to just come level with the grain mix


 


60% whole wheat flour             250 grams


coarse dark rye flour                 30 grams


hi gluten flour                          50 grams * note- this is what I used, but regular bread flour would probably be OK as well if  mixed longer


 


salt                                          5 grams


mature sour                            40 grams


instant yeast                             4 grams 


*water                                    200 mls    


* note- this is approximate since I didn't measure the water. What I wanted was a well developed medium soft dough. Take into account the soaking water for the grains in the  total water percentage using 60% as a guide for total water.


Mixing


Soak the grain blend in the water for 30-40 minutes


Add the remaining ingredients to the mixer bowl and mix on 1st speed for 4 minutes. Increase to 2nd speed and mix for 4-5 minutes until the dough is well developed. You may have to mix it longer because of the seeds, which hamper the gluten development. Dough temp should be 72F  Bulk ferment for 2 hrs in a covered bowl. Fold after an hour, and again in 40 min depending on gas development. Final rise approx. 1 hr, covered with a damp towel and sprayed with water once or twice during the rise time. Bake at 430F for 15 then lower the heat to 410F and bake an additional 20-25 minutes. Cool on a rack thoroughly before slicing.



 


 


 

hanseata's picture
hanseata

and i can imagine it tastes good, too. I also just experimented with a 7-grain mixture (Pain a l'Ancienne with multigrain), soaking it like you did.


Karin

wally's picture
wally

and nice slashing as well!  Looks like a tasty bread to me from your crumb shot.


Larry

Franko's picture
Franko

Thank you Larry,


I'm sort of on the fence about the slashing. One the one hand I like it because it did what slashing is supposed to do by creating a controlled expansion point in the rising loaf, and that it give the loaf a distinctive look. On the other hand I'd rather have made less aggressive cuts to it. Tough to judge sometimes with a new mix , but that's the beauty of it , you get to try it again until you get it right.


Thanks again,


Franko

Franko's picture
Franko

Hi Karin,


Thanks. It honestly surprised me how good it tastes for what is basically a straight dough. I've been reviving my starter/mature sour over the last week or so and I think that that's the main reason for it having the flavor it does. Quite tangy with a good long aftertaste.


How are you healing after your adventure with the mandolin? If it's any consolation, I did almost exactly the same thing to myself with my own when I first got it. I was wincing as I read your post, nodding and thinking to myself 'oh ya, been there done that'. Such a hassle to have hand injuries when you work with dough every day.


Thanks again, all the best,


Franko

hanseata's picture
hanseata

Thanks for your good wishes, Franko - it doesn't hurt anymore, it's just the annoying cut in the nail that keeps snagging - I'm going through a lot of band-aids just because of that.


It's funny, if you bake your own breads for a while, you have a hard time eating some quick, same day made bread you get in a restaurant (if you get bread at all). I found that I become more and more picky, a bread that had time to develop its flavor just tastes so much better.


Karin


 

Mebake's picture
Mebake

Nice Healthy multigrain bread, Well done for a Plan B!


Khalid