The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Pain Poilâine™ is flown to the San Francisco peninsula

chef_ub's picture
chef_ub

Pain Poilâine™ is flown to the San Francisco peninsula

Just so ya know, Pain Poilâine™ is flown in to the USA periodically by Gourmet Corner, San Mateo, CA. thegourmetcorner.com. For those interested in tasting the holy grail, this is where you can get it for $29. A bargain when compared to ordering it directly from Poilâine.

William

hansjoakim's picture
hansjoakim

I'd much rather pay for slices of homebaked bread from CA-based members of this board.


Nothing beats fresh, local (organic) products that have travelled the shortest possible way from manufacturer to consumer. Just the thought of flying bread from one corner of the world to another, especially in a time where the environment and our natural resources are under such pressure, is (pardon the language) quite insane.

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

I'd mail you a slice of the Kornbroyt I baked today at no cost to you, if it were not quite insane.


Hmmm ... I have just coined a new term: "Locovore," referring to those who prefer foods from far away. This is the antonym of "Locavore." 


David

Jazzdad's picture
Jazzdad

not sure if I have the spelling right however I'd really appreciate the recipe for Kornbroyt

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

The recipe is under testing for a cookbook that will be published in 2011. There will be plenty of talk about it on TFL, so stay tuned. In the meantime, we cannot share the recipes. Sorry.


David

chef_ub's picture
chef_ub

that my well intended post would result in such a self-serving lecture on the evils of using up natural resources "under such pressure" for a "quite insane" purpose. A case of 5 loaves of bread that hitches a ride on an Air France plane full of money spending frog tourists, making a scheduled trip from "one corner of the world to another", does not consume an additional natural resources. Enjoy your fresh (organic) CA-based bread made with flour or wheat grown in another corner of the USA.


William

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

Hi, William.


I do not believe that either hansjoakim or I was responding to your good intentions. In fact, the information you provided was of interest.


Philosophical differences regarding the merits of the locavore movement are legitimate objects of debate and discussion. Please accept my apologies if you took my message as a personal attack on you. That was in no way my intention.


David

suave's picture
suave

So you don't like it when people express opinions that don't match yours, but slurs are fine with you?

AnnaInMD's picture
AnnaInMD

crust?  i often wish i had a means of tasting my German hometown bread to see if I remember the taste correctly and am properly duplicating it.

Caperchick's picture
Caperchick

Dearest William:


I know these posts are getting off the mark, so to speak, but the day is long enough that you can come up with a more complimentary word for the French than Frog.............., if French tourists help your economy consider yourself lucky.  In today's economic market.........it all counts.  No name calling for any nationality, let's just enjoy each nationality's bread and be at peace. 


Merci,.................Lyn Roche 

chef_ub's picture
chef_ub

Thank you for your comment. As my original post immediately became political, I used a reference that is today considered by many, as politically incorrect. It is no excuse that I am from a time when ethnic references were not often taken as offensive and were commonplace and actually used by those ethnic groups. I apologize to anyone who was offended. I will do better.


William

Caperchick's picture
Caperchick

Dearest William:


Thank you for your response.  Like you, I am also from that era.  Nice that we can learn to be more respectful in this day and age. 


Pizza dough calls so off I must go.  Not as good as being in Italy, or Paris.......but still delicious.


Regards.............Lyn

Maisonbleu's picture
Maisonbleu

Glad to hear "the real thing" is available in California.  As I have gone to Poilaine in Paris and tried the loaves, I would say-wait for a chance to visit the shop.  Flights tend to age bread and it is never as good as the very fresh loaf.    Hope you can avoid the $29- cost


and for a Euro or two enjoy the"real thing".  Maisonbleu

Jazzdad's picture
Jazzdad

I've been baking this which is supposedly a good copy and I like the end result sorry no pics  http://www.breadtopia.com/whole-grain-sourdough/

highmtnpam's picture
highmtnpam

For those of us who don't get to France often, it would be a good experience to taste the bread.  It is hard to get a real idea of a loaf through a picture.


Pam

chef_ub's picture
chef_ub

exactly. I do not see a trip to Paris in my future and therefore thought that this could be an opportunity for those inclined to experience what probably is the most famous bread anywhere, however its quality may or may not be compromised by air travel. I also remember reading that it is recommended that this bread be eaten 2 or 3 days after it is baked. Poilane's own site  www.poilane.fr/pages/en/michemore_conseils.php  implies that it will keep up to 5 days, unsliced, and after that should be toasted.


William


 

MushCreek's picture
MushCreek

Here's my attempt at Polaine's Pain de Campagne. I follow the recipe from Clayton's book, and I've never had any complaints. That being said, I'd like to taste the 'real' thing to see how far off I am. I'd rather taste it in Paris, though!