The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Family Grain Mill

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klmhicks's picture
klmhicks

Family Grain Mill

This is my first journey into milling it is also my first post after months of lurking. I can't tell you all how much I appreciate you sharing your time and knowledge. If I have any questions this is my go to place.


I am looking at buying a mill for whole grain flour, cracked grains and flaking. I am considering the Family Grain Mill. I have been in touch with Pleasant Hill Grain extensively regarding this mill. It seems I will have to do a few passes to get the fine flour for breads. I am also considering buying the adapter to my Viking Mixer due to the grain will grind finer with the 1000 watts opposed to the 145 watts of the FGM motor base, as I've been told by Pleasant Hill. 


Does anyone have any experience with this mill and how do you like it, pros, cons?


 


Thanks,


Kathy


 

Crider's picture
Crider

I would disagree with that logic that a more powerful motor would give you finer flour from the same grinding heads on the Family Grain Mill. I've been shopping for hand grain mills recently and have seen the Family get good reviews on the web. If I had one, I would expect to grind, then sift, then regrind what was left behind in the sifter. 

klmhicks's picture
klmhicks

I have this very question into Pleasant Hill now. I could not figure this logic either. 


That is also the process I was thinking of sifting between grinds. Though I'm not sure it is necessary.


Pleasant Hill reply:  I believe it will be finer simply because of the rpm's and wattage of the motor of the Viking. It will turn the burrs faster. There is a difference between the flour fineness from hand to motor base.

Crider's picture
Crider

I'm still not onboard with their logic.


But what you might want to consider in your decision is how it would be to actually use either version -- the trade-offs between attaching the mill to your mixer if you got the adapter vs. storing the motor base or having enough counter space for both the motor base and your mixer. I think the motor base is more expensive than the adapter, right? On the other hand, how often are you expecting to use the mill and how much of an effort is required to attach the adapter to the mixer?  Good luck!

berryblondeboys's picture
berryblondeboys

Don't the mixer mills make the grain hot? killing off the nutrients that grinding your own wheat is supposedly trying to save?

klmhicks's picture
klmhicks

She has milled for 30 years and she said there will be a difference and will be quicker with the higher wattage. I'll know when I get it. I ordered the adapter opposed to the motor base. I will try it out with the mixer and see what happens even though I do not have anything to compare it to as this is my first time milling.


As for the heat. I am not completely on board with the heat debate. It should not heat more so because it should be faster therefore less time in the mill. Also, what is the heating of the grain in the mill going to kill that the oven won't? 


The motor base is $130 more than the adapter and if I don't like the adapter way I can return it within 30 days and opt for the motor. I don't like the idea of lugging the Viking out to mill but for $130 I'll do it to get started and to save the money.

doughyboy's picture
doughyboy

I have a Pleasant Hill grain mill. I have been using it for 5 + years. I have been milling hard red wheat, hard white wheat, soft wheat, rye, barley, oats, (have I forgotten any grain?) all for bread making purposes and almost exclusively with my own sourdough culture. In any case the mill works amazingly well. I am not sure why you need the flour milled any finer than the mill provides. It is no courser than standard whole wheat flour you will buy in my estimation.


However, its drawback is that it does heat the flour. I have no way of knowing how much nutrient value is lost. I can say this. The bread tastes great. With that said, I do have the Country Living Grain Mill in my Amazon 'wish list' just in case my rich Auntie wants to find me a great birthday gift. 

doughyboy's picture
doughyboy

Sorry, I jumped in too soon. It's the Grain Master Whisper Mill that I purchased from Pleasant Hill and not the Family Grain Mill. I love my Whisper mill except for the fact that it heats the flour and it does not whisper. It roars. Aside from that I am happy with the consistency of the flour. But as I mentioned previously I am gravitating towards strengthening my forearms with the best hand mill on the market, The Country Living Grain Mill. 

Paddlers2's picture
Paddlers2

The higher wattage alone won't mill faster; higher RPM's will.   I have the FGM with the motor base and use it for everything but whole popcorn and garbanzos (my Vitamix reduces them to a manageable grind, then the FGM takes over with no problem).  Since I don't bake large quantities, the FGM is great for me.


With regard to the heat, I have measured the flour temperature as it drops from the FGM's grinder and the temperature so far has never exceeded 99 degrees F.  I would imagine that grinding with the same mechanism but at higher RPMs might generate more heat, but I don't believe it would be significant.   


Also, I have noted that both the Mill and the FGM Flaker appear to be exactly the same as the Electrolux DLX accessory attachments sold with the Electrolux DLX Assistant (perhaps a different mounting flange - I can't tell, but the same unit otherwise) 


For me the FGM is perfectly adequate for home use with virtually any milling job except as I mentioned above. Your adaptor seems to be a reasonable alternative to the motor base.  Either way, I think you've got a good, reliable setup. 


 


 

jerrycentral's picture
jerrycentral

I burned up 2 big kitchen aid mixers with the attachment,  I have been using the hand crank since the second one died.  The last KA was under warenty so I was able to get a new one.