The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Electrolux DLX-2000 Magic Mill Assistent Stand mixer vs Viking 7qt mixer

erlinda100's picture
erlinda100

Electrolux DLX-2000 Magic Mill Assistent Stand mixer vs Viking 7qt mixer

Does any one have a suggestion on which mixer I should buy.  I want something more powerful and stable than my Kitchen Aid.   I really like the features and look of the Electrolux, I see its a 600 watt and the viking is 1,000 watt.  Is one better than the other.  I bake bread several 2-4 x a week now.  2-4 loaves at a time.  Any feedback would be appreciated

Thanks, Erlinda

mizrachi's picture
mizrachi

I adore it.  It is reliable, effective, and will last forever.

 

 

toyman's picture
toyman

I regularly mix up 11# of bread/pizza dough without issue.  The open top makes it easy to load the bowl, its quiet, powerful and stable.  Before I got my Electrolux I used my wifes Kitchenaid and decided to get the Electrolux before I burned out the Kitchenaid.  I don't remember the specifics, but I don't believe that watts translate into the amount of energy the motor produces (torque), but the amount of energy that the motor uses, at least that's what I recall? 

erlinda100's picture
erlinda100

One last question for you.  can you use the mixer for small batches?  Say 1-2 loaves of bread or 1 cake?

Thanks Erlinda

erlinda100's picture
erlinda100

Mizrachi,  Thanks for your input, I am leaning towards the Electrolux. Wondering if the 1,000 watt vs 600 watt makes a big difference.

mizrachi's picture
mizrachi

my guess is the 600 watts will suffice just fine.  I've never seen my electrolux strain, even with larger quantities. 

 

You can always turn to the yahoo stand mixers forum for more input.

 

Good luck!

berryblondeboys's picture
berryblondeboys

More watts does not mean it will fair better. KAs have 600 watts (or 500 watts) and their motor burns up on dense doughs. My DLX 2000 has 450 watts and it can power through, with no straining a huge, triple batch of the heaviest dough you can imagine. More power does not mean that the rest of the machine USES that power correctly. And a lot of the 'more wattage' stuff is purely gimmic/marketing to make buyers think they are getting more/better than lower wattage stuff.  More watts also means it uses more energy!

erlinda100's picture
erlinda100

Thank you all for the feedback,  you have answered my question.  I'll go with the Electrolux.  Thank God for this site.

Cheers, Erlinda

GENE FOSTER's picture
GENE FOSTER

My wife had used an older model of KA. I can't remember which.  We finally threw it away and I got a KA Professional 600.  No problems with this one at all.  Have used it for everything for about 6 months.  Just keeps on ticking.  Each of us have to get what works best for us.

erlinda100's picture
erlinda100

One last question for you.  can you use the mixer for small batches?  Say 1-2 loaves of bread or 1 cake?

Thanks Erlinda

berryblondeboys's picture
berryblondeboys

I make both cakes and bread (better at cakes for now). I use the smaller white bowl and whisk for my cake batters. I LOVE it for cake. It's very open, so it's very easy to add ingredients and to see how it is mixing. I actually bought a KA to make cakes after I already had this DLX simply because I wanted a bigger capacity, or a second bowl/whisk for when I have big orders, but I returned the KA after one use. I just prefer how the DLX mixes better.

I make my frosting/icing in the big stainless steel bowl and I LOVE that too. So easy.

Then for breads, I do it all in the stainless steel bowl. I don't usually make more than 2 loaves at a time and sometimes only one and it can handle whatever batch you have because you can adjust the roller position.

 

I will say this though, there is a serious learning curve to this machine for the stainless steel with roller an scraper, so don't get too frustrated, but the machine is a complete machine and will serve you well.

erlinda100's picture
erlinda100

BBB,  Thank you for all the information seems that you can do almost anything with this machine.  Now I to figure out to whom to order it from, and whether to get the metal version or the plastic. I'm assuming they are equally sturdy and your paying a couple of hundred more for having the Chrome. I can understand your passion for this machine.

Cheers,  Erlinda

berryblondeboys's picture
berryblondeboys

I have the black chrome one. I won it on a mislabeled eBay auction. It's beautiful and worthy of staying our on the counter, but it's not all metal. The underside is still plastic. The only advantage it has for me is aesthetics. It blends nicely with other appliances and I don't have to worry it yellowing like my 14 year old cuisinart food processor. But I didn't buy new and full price. I would have a hard time Spending more just for color, but I would always wonder if I would regret getting white. However mine is housed in the mudroom when morning use, so it's not like people are going to see mine either.

erlinda100's picture
erlinda100

BBB,  Never thought about buying one from ebay (though I've bought 100's of things over the years.  I'd worry about no warrenty, but I will log onto ebay after this email and check it out.

Erlinda

toyman's picture
toyman

erlinda - I ordered min from http://www.pleasanthillgrain.com/magic_mill_dlx_mixer.aspx  They were excellent to deal with.  When you order the mixer it will come with the stainless bowl, plastic bowl, and the whisks for the plastic bowl, along with the dough hook, scraper and roller. 

erlinda100's picture
erlinda100

Toyman,   Funny that is the webpage I found and have decided to order from them too.  No tax and free shipping along with a good price.  A couple on ebay slightly used and look good for 400+ but I think I want the full warranty.

thanks again,  Erlinda

erlinda100's picture
erlinda100

Just received my Electrolux in the mail.  The pictures/instructions don't seem very clear.  For making 1-2 loaves of bread do you prefer the roller or the dough hook? I'm not sure how to adjust it for different amounts of dough I guess I'll figure it out.  I'll try it tommorrow morning. Any suggestions?  

Erlinda

toyman's picture
toyman

Erlinda, I've had no problems with 'relatively' small batches, say 2-3#'s.  Sorry that I can't help you on the cakes, my wife makes those :) and uses her KA. 

Oh, and if you're interested, the process I use with my DLX for bread and pizza dough is as follows:

I start with the roller and scraper.  I add my wet ingredients to the bowl, and then 75% of the flour.  Let that mix just until it's incorporated, and then a 20 min. autolyze.  After that I change out the roller for the dough hook and then add the balance of the dry ingredients.  (sometimes I add them all into the balance of the flour, sometimes I add them individually, salt being last)  Once everything comes together, I'll speed up the mixer and then check the dough temps until done. 

erlinda100's picture
erlinda100

Toyman,  I'm definitely interested in all and any methods to get the best from this mixer so when I receive it I will incorporate your suggestions.  :0).   

Thanks again, Erlinda

holds99's picture
holds99

I have both a Kitchen Aid (20+ years old made by Hobart and still runs great) and a recently purchased (a year ago) Electrolux DLX N26 Assistent.  For large batches you can't beat the 10 qt. capacity of the DLX and it can do a very gentle mix or can mix dough at good clip.  I use the DLX for most of my baking and I occasionally do large 8 lb. batches.  I use my K.A. for small volume (single loaf, small batch of rolls, bagels, etc.).  If I had to choose only one mixer it would be the DLX.

Howard

erlinda100's picture
erlinda100

Howard,   I was going to get rid of my Kitchen Aid,  (it's about 18 years old) but now I think I will keep it and use it for when I make only one loaf.  Good idea!  Do you know how long ago Hobart stopped making the kitchen Aid?  Seems they were made better then.  Am  I wrong?

Erlinda

holds99's picture
holds99

Mine is a Kithen Aid K5-A and it's build like a tank.  For it's size it's a real workhorse, Yes, they were definitely made much better then, no plastic gears, no flimsy attachments, etc.  I think Hobart still sells an equivalent mixer to the K5-A for commercial use that costs around $1.000.00.  I'm holding onto mine.  It's an old friend that has been with me for 20+ years and together we have made more than a thousand loaves of bread.

Hang onto your old K.A..  K.A, is great for making merangues, small loaves AND ciabatta, where you need to really move the dough fast for about a minute or so during the final mix.  Rose Levy Berenbaum has a terrific ciabatta recipe in her book "Bread Bible" using a K.A.

Best to you in your baking adventures,

Howard

erlinda100's picture
erlinda100

Howard,   I will hold onto my KA then.  It is model K5SS 325 Watts.   I will order the Electrolux this week.  I am very tempted to buy a used one,  the price is excellent, the description says used very little, still has the box but the person can not find the manual that goes with it.  I will make up my mind in the next couple of days.  Didn't you say you got your Electrolux used?  What do you think.

Have a great Sunday,  I'm in sunny California

Erlinda

holds99's picture
holds99

Erlinda,

Don't know how to advise you re: buying a used machine.    Just check the used price against the price at Pleasant Hill Grain.

http://www.pleasanthillgrain.com/magic_mill_dlx_mixer.aspx

I purchased mine new from Pleasant Hill Grain.  They're terrific people to deal with and are very responsive when you call or e-mail them. 

The DLX is fairly straight forward to use, so if you don't get a user manual with the one you buy you may be able to get one from the Pleasant Hill Grain folks. 

Best of luck with your purchase of a DLX.

Howard

berryblondeboys's picture
berryblondeboys

There is another site that sells the dlx cheaper, but I
not sure of the customer service. I do know that you can get things for older used machines. I got mine used, ordered a manual and then recently bought replacement whisk beaters as I broke mine. Totally my fault too.

holds99's picture
holds99

Make sure you get all the DLX attachments.  Check out the Pleasant Hill site and see the attachments that they offer with the DLX and make sure the used machine that you're considering buying has all the attachments.  FWIW, keep in mind that you also get a warranty when you buy new.

After purchasing my DLX I subsequently purchased a grain mill which works very well for moderate amounts of milling.  Maybe later you might want to consider a grain mill if you're using cracked grains in your breads or want to mill your own flour.

Howard

erlinda100's picture
erlinda100

Howard,   Saving a couple of hundred is probably not worth it. Don't  like the idea of not getting a warranty either.  Thanks for all your feedback.  I'll let you know after I get it and use it.

Erlinda

erlinda100's picture
erlinda100

Howard,   I just ordered the Matte White Electrolux DLX from Pleasant Hill Grain this morning.  Can't wait to get and try it out.  Thanks for all the help you and the others have give me.  I feel very good about spending 600.00 for this machine.

Cheers,  Erlinda

berryblondeboys's picture
berryblondeboys

Oh glad you pulled the trigger. That $600 gets you an awful lot. You could buy two ka 600s with it, but with bread making, you would burn out two before this one would wear out and you have way mire capacity when you need it.

Heinie convinced my husband of the measley $235 I spent on mine as that it would pay itself off in one summer and it did.

Good breads are expensive, so are any other baked goods. You cut the price in half up to 90% by making it youself and it's healtheir and fresher. You'll have it paid for fast if you use it a lot over store bought baked goods.

FaithHope's picture
FaithHope

I love my DLX.  Killed 2 KA, finally my dad bought me the DLX last year.  It's awesome!!  Took me awhile to get the hang of how to use it, but now I just love it.  It kinda works backward compared to the KA.  You have to put in your wet ingre. first.  I'm sure you'll get the hang of it.  Don't get discouraged, it's well worth getting to know it!  I'm excited for you!! :)

Faith

erlinda100's picture
erlinda100

Faith,  It appears people are really passionate about their Machines,  I can't wait to get it.  Works backward huh?  Hmmm should be fun.

Erlinda

mattie405's picture
mattie405

I bought mine used on EBAY, I think it's a pretty old model but it has held up fine for over 5 years now, the manual was totally useless IMHO. It came with all that comes with a new one and I got it for $265 which was a decent savings over the cost of a new one. I made sure to email the seller before bidding and made sure she/he would offer a gaurantee of sorts that it would work when it was delivered. If the seller balks at offering that kind of basic gaurantee I wouldn't even consider bidding, I also paid to have the package insured in case it was damaged in shipping. All in all it was a good experience for me. Before I bought mine I also called the only repair guy in the USA, a Mr. Roth in NJ and he said he himself would take a chance on the one I was buying as the price was good and they hold up well, he thought it would have to have been severly abused to not work, and the pictures the seller posted looked like a well cared for machine. He also told me he sometimes gets some scratched models that can't be sold as new and he sells them at a lower price, that might be another way to go for your purchase. I don't have his number handy but do remember it was in the 201 area code. Mattie

berryblondeboys's picture
berryblondeboys

I agree with above. If you can get a screaming used deal, get it, but mist go to high for the risk. I got a black chrome one used on eBay for $235 shipped because it was mislabeled. I was the only bid. That's a savings if like $600 foebthe exact same model, so it was worth the risk, burbto pay $400 used white one. No way.

erlinda100's picture
erlinda100

Mattie,  Thank you for your information.  I have purchased 100's of things from ebay so I agree you have to ask the right questions.  Two used models were up for about $400,  another started at 100 now near 300 with 5 days to go.  I decided this morning to go with Pleasant Hill Grains as it was recommended by people from this site.  $600 but I like the idea of the 3 year warranty.  Though gauging by what I hear I will never need to use it.  I'm wondering who Pleasant Hill refers you to if you need repairs. I can't wait to receive it through the post.

Cheers,  Erlinda

 

erlinda100's picture
erlinda100

holds99,    Thank you I will do as you say,  I will use the KA for small batches and the DLX for over 4 lbs.  I guess I can bake a 2 lb loaf,  and reserve the rest of the dough overnight in the fridge and bake it the next day, or give it away. I appreciate you getting back to me so soon.

Hope you have a great weekend, 

Erlinda

 

holds99's picture
holds99

When I make 8 lbs of dough (with the DLX) I divide it in half (equally by weight) and put it into two seperate containers.  You can do the same thing with 4 lbs of dough.  One container (4 lbs of dough) I bake after bulk fermentation (room temp.), dividing, shaping and final fermentation in a banneton or couche.  

The other container (4 lbs of dough) goes in the fridge for overnight retardation and baking the following day.  You should try to make larger amounts of dough (at least 4 lbs each time you mix a batch).  That way you can bake - two each - 2 lb loaves and freeze the extra loaf for later use---after the first loaf has been used up.  I do it that way most of the time.  I think it's much more economical and not much more work to make 4 lbs of dough at a time and have an extra loaf in the freezer.

Your DLX is a great machine and a real workhorse, so use it as much as possible.  The more you use it, the more you'll love it.

Best Wishes and have a good weekend,

Howard

 

erlinda100's picture
erlinda100

Howard,  Actually putting together 4lbs of dough this morning, spilled some of flour,  dough worked up the side of the roller before I could push it down, (Yikes) I'll get the hang of it.  Letting it Autolylse for 1/2 hour.  I will divide this in half and bake 1/2 today,  and the rest in the fridge to bake tommorrow.  I'm getting good advice thank god.  One person says its a good idea to start with the liquid first then add the flour. What do you think?  This is what I did this morning. Good idea until I spilt the flour pouring it into the large running mixing bowl of the DXL.

Thanks for the help, Have a great weekend

Erlinda

holds99's picture
holds99

Erlinda,

Use a flat wooden spoon, with a reasonably long handle to keep the dough from riding up the side of the roller.  I keep a 2 cup measuring cup of water and dip the wooden spoon in it (to keep the dough from sticking to the spoon) and use it to carefully push the dough down when it starts riding up the side of the roller.  Actually, I seldom use the white rotary insert.  I mostly use the dough scraper and the metal dough hook, which works great, especially with large amounts of dough---and the wet wooden spoon.

The person who suggested starting with the liquid first and then adding the flour is right on!  That way you can judge the level of hydration (stickiness of the dough) as you go along.  Remember some flours, like rye and whole wheat with the bran, will absorb more water than an equal amount of white flour.  So, you'll eventually develp a feel for the dough (by touching it) and be able to pretty much tell by the stickyness of the dough whether or not the hydration level is right.  Just keep at it, you're doing great. 

It's like learning to ride a bike---only different :>)

Hang in there and keep us posted,

Howard