The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Element ignited

Rodger's picture
Rodger

Element ignited

The element in my 15-year-old GE Profile electric range ignited this morning while I was preheating the oven for baguettes.  It's not the first time.  It lit up into a fine white welding-torch flame at one of the bends in the metal.  I hit the circuit breaker and let the thing extinguish itself.


I can replace the element, as I have done in the past, but I am inclined this time to replace the range.  Have any of you determined whether one or another conventional electric range is better able to stand up to a baker's demands?  Have others burned through the elements in their rangers, or do I have an aging lemon? 



Thanks,
Rodger

mrfrost's picture
mrfrost

I am on at least the third element on my about 15-20 year old built in, wall GE oven(inherited from parents). I believe this is strictly a matter of the replacement elements being of inferior quality to the original part. Especially in light of the grueling use in baking breads. They went basically as you described. No flame though, just a "white hot" spot in the element.


I will happily continue to replace my elements(every 5 years or so) as long as everything else holds up. I needed my most recent replacement a little more than a year ago, when I began my pretty heavy duty bread/pizza baking "hobby". It was only about $21 delivered from any ebay shop. I had replaced it about 6 years before that from a local appliance parts store, with a present day price of $35.


Besides that, I can't believe how nicely this regular oven bakes. I guess the only issue one might have is if they are not able to do the replacement themselves(really easy). I imagine  a service call to do it would be $100 or so.


DougMagic's picture
DougMagic

Replacing the element should be the easiest and cheapest thing to do. You should also be able to replace it with one from a local second-hand appliance shop. I did this for $15 cash recently. I would imagine that moving up would only mean more problems. "Durable goods" are not quite as durable as they used to be. Unless you buy a professional grade oven to the tune of $1,000.00 I would just replace the element. Elements are designed to wear out and need replacing, the oven should last a lifetime.

Rodger's picture
Rodger

Thanks to you both for your sanely conservative advice.  Why throw another range into the landfill?  It is true, however, what DougMagic says about the diminishing durability of goods.  While messing with the element, we discovered a crack in the oven floor, which returns us to the original dilemma.  Crack or no, I'll plug in a fresh element and see how it goes.  Thanks again for your help.


Rodger