The Fresh Loaf

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Bulk white whole wheat flour where to get and how to store?

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berryblondeboys's picture
berryblondeboys

Bulk white whole wheat flour where to get and how to store?

Now that I'm actually making bread regularly and we've moved, I want to buy in bulk. We LOVE the White Whole wheat, but buying it 5 lbs at a time is more expensive than it needs to be, but are all brands/mills created equally? I see KAF doesn't sell it in more the 5 lbs bags and I can get it for that price locally. I 'think' you can buy several packs (a flat) from whole foods with a 10% discount, but are there other options for bulk?


 


And then, how best to store it? I think I'll be splitting whatever I get with a baker friend who lives in a townhouse who can't store huge amounts at a time, so I don't need to store ALL of it at my house.


 


Suggestions?


Melissa

Nickisafoodie's picture
Nickisafoodie

Check out this website: http://www.organicwheatproducts.com/?page_id=70


I've ordered Rhonda's hard red wheat recently and it made the best bread that I have ever used- and cheaper even after freight to my NJ home.  I have no doubt her white will be of similar quality.  And good shipping rates too as the USPS has flat rate shipping if you fill a box (of which there are several sizes).  Give her a call.  Pleasant to deal with.


I use 5 gallon buckets (must be food grade, which is a different plastic compound than non-food grade).  These can be found on the web at about $6 each.  Also, I highly recommending the Gamma lid (also about $6 per)- it allows you to unscrew the lid to take out or to refill buckets with a diameter that is as big as the bucket, rather than a two inch hole with a screw top that standard lids have. Slightly more up front cost but much easier in the long run.  I store all in my cool basement.  Have never had a problem with bugs or mold doing it this way, even after two years of storage.  There are other methods and suppliers that I'm sure others will post too!  They sprouted grains from the pyramids after all!  Good luck...

Renee B's picture
Renee B

I am glad you mentioned Rhonda.  I have been trying to order from her, but she won't reply. Her prices are great.  I am kind of afraid that they might have been hit by those tornados.  Have you been in contact with her lately?

flourgirl51's picture
flourgirl51

I am still here. Dan hurt his back and is unable to lift anything so we are in the process of getting some help to move grain around. Should be good to go the first of August.

Renee B's picture
Renee B

I was really worried when I didn't hear back from you and then I saw on road runner news about the tornadoes in Western Mn.  I'll be giving you a call after the first.  I hope your husband is well.

flourgirl51's picture
flourgirl51

The tornado touched down 7 miles from here with one casualty. It skipped over one of our farms and hit the one next to us. Thank you for your concern. I am looking forward to your call.

berryblondeboys's picture
berryblondeboys

I looked at her site, and it is as expensive as buying KAF flour at the grocery store. (90 cents a pound BEFORE grinding, $1.10 with grinding - not including shipping). I can get KAF WWW for $4.99 for a 5 lbs bag. with the Whole Food discount, I can get it for $4.50 a pound. Maybe that is my best option. Not finding much through a google search.

Nickisafoodie's picture
Nickisafoodie

Sorry, not sure why I was thinking of whole grain (perhaps because I mill my own or because it can be stored for long periods of time). 


Whole Wheat (red or white) is best bought in small quantities as the nutrients can oxidize relatively quickly. Refrigeration would be best for other than a few weeks worth of use, some would argue a few days worth.  On the other hand, refined white flour has been stripped of most of the nutrients and thus has a very long shelf life.  Any bitterness in the flour is a sign of it turning.


Unlike ground whole grain  red or white flour, your typical all purpose or bread flour flour will last forever because most the the nutrients are stripped out during the grinding/refining process- warehouse clubs are a good source for 25 pound bags.  That leaves you with still needing to find white whole wheat flour. 


If you feel you have the storgage part nailed down and perhaps the following:


1) your local bakery (special order a sack for you)


2) wholesale baking suppliers- some will sell you retail and perhaps you can special order a bag usually 25 pounds or 50lbs of white whole wheat flour? Google this and lots turns up


3) My local health food store will order anything that I ask for from such places like Arrowhead Mills - usually in 25 pound or 50 pound bags, a week or so advance notice needed.  that may be your best option


Good luck...

berryblondeboys's picture
berryblondeboys

Maybe I should look into grinding my own? I'm sure it does taste better....hmm.... Is it a terrible messy and time cosuming thing? I guess I'll have to do a search.

flourgirl51's picture
flourgirl51

HI


 I am not sure about the KA flour but mine is certified organic.


 

llvdoughboy's picture
llvdoughboy

Meijer has KAF (8x5lb bags) for $26.38 + shipping.  I just store it in freezer unril I need it.

beeman1's picture
beeman1

I have been milling my flour for years. There is no storage problems and the flour is always fresh. I get my wheat from bulk ordering from Wheat Montana. No mess.

berryblondeboys's picture
berryblondeboys

Of course, milling your own adds another expense (and the main reason we are making our own bread is to cut back on the expense of bread)... We were spending a minimum of $15 a week just on bread, when making it myself is a few bucks a week.


Hand cranking is probably not going to happen...

Renee B's picture
Renee B

How in the world can you afford the shipping?  I went to their website because I'd never been there before and a $60 order of wheat berries was going to cost over $160 dollars.  Rhonda is still cheaper, they grow it themselves and she ships flat rate.

k welch's picture
k welch

I mill my own flour as well.  I get my grain from the Bread Becker's out of Woodstock, GA.  They have co-ops, and by using one, it can help cut  down on the cost a bit.  The website is Breadbeckers.com.  They have a lot of neat products, including mills to grind wheat/corn/etc. When you mill the grain into flour the oxidation process begins.  After a day about 30% of the nutrients oxidize out of the flour.  So milling as needed is the best way to go to get all the nutrients you can out of the grain.  By the time you get your already ground flour from anyone you order it from, I would say it has lost most of the nutrients. Sure, you will still get fiber out of it. 


Good luck on your search.


Karan


 


 


 

k welch's picture
k welch

Just as an FYI, your grain (wheat berries) can store for decades with the proper container, where moisture and  bugs don't get to it.  They, archealogists, have found grains in the tombs in Egypt, planted them and they have grown.  It is after the grain is broken open/cracked/milled that it starts to oxidize.  Fresh milled flour obviously doesn't have preservatives, so it will go rancid.