The Fresh Loaf

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Do you have a recipe for raisin sandwich loaf? Michel's Baguette, Toronto ON

4.184kj's picture
4.184kj

Do you have a recipe for raisin sandwich loaf? Michel's Baguette, Toronto ON

Hello,


I am a new bread baker trying to recreate my family's favourite raisin sandwich loaf from Michel's Baguette, Toronto, ON.  The loaf is a plain white sandwich style loaf, mixed with raisins.  I've tried a few recipes including the American sandwich loaf from America's Test Kitchen, Hokkaido milk loaf, and some other Japanese style bread recipes using variations of AP, bread, and cake flour.  None of them was exactly what I was looking for.  Sometimes my loaves come out dense, and most of the time, they dried out the next day.  Any ideas/suggestions? 


My typical method includes


- using a toaster oven, set at 25 degrees less than recipe calls for


- using whole milk when milk is needed in recipe


- usually use AP flour, because of ATK's recipe uses it and it was the closest to the recipe I am looking for


- no egg recipes, looking for a white loaf


- pressing dough into a rectangle, rolling it swiss-style, then pressing it again into a rectangle and re-rolling it (is this too much handling?)


- brushing on whole milk before putting loaves in oven


- halfway through baking, rotate, and cover loaves with foil to prevent overbrowning


- check temperature and remove once loaves hit 190 celcius


- cool for 10 mins, then remove and let cool on wire rack


- once cooled, place in plastic bag


- cut, study, and taste loaves to see outcome :)


 


Thanks! :)


4.184kj


 


 

LindyD's picture
LindyD

If you use the TFL search bar, you'll find plenty of raisin bread recipes.


I'm just not sure how successful any of them will be if baked in a toaster oven.


But, at least you'll have fun trying.

Franko's picture
Franko

Here's a recipe for a pretty standard raisin loaf. If you don't have access to an oven other than a toaster oven I'm not sure it's worth trying because you may wind up wasting ingredients. Toaster ovens aren't meant to bake breads no matter what the manufacturer says, so don't bother. The reason why they can't bake breads properly is they don't have enough interior space for the heat to circulate evenly. The heat tends to localize in one or two area's and leaves others relatively cool. That's been my experience since I last used one , but maybe they've gotten better. Your call .


 


Raisin or Fruit bread

makes 2 loaves of 483 grams each

bread or all purpose flour   425 grams
granulated sugar                22 gr
salt                                   10 gr
milk                                  20 mls
butter/shortening               35 gr
water (temp-29* C/85*F)   263 mls
yeast (instant dry)              11 gr
raisins


and/or mixed                180 gr
 candied fruit (not washed) Optional

 Place all the ingredients (except the raisins/fruit) in the stand mixer or bowl if mixing by hand and mix slowly till all are combined. Mix on 2nd speed for approx. 8 minutes and check that your dough is not too soft. Add small increments of flour if this is the case till you acheive a med soft dough.

Add the unwashed raisins/fruit on low speed (if using a mixer of any kind) till thoroughly combined with the dough but without letting the raisins break up or shred. Cover dough with an upside down bowl or plastic sheet . Bulk ferment for 1.5-2 hrs at 80*F then divide the dough into 483 grms pieces, round and let rest for 10-15 min. Mold into loaves or rounds,  egg wash-optional (whole egg+120mls water beaten together). Final proof/rise till doubled, bake at 200*C/400F for 25-30 min. [ *** watch the colour carefully after 20 min and adjust the heat down by 10-15 * F and open the oven door if it's browning too much. ] This is a rich dough so you need to let it cool down completely before slicing it. 5-6 hrs is best  if possible.  If you have any questions please don't hesitate to ask.


Good Luck,


Franko


 


 


 

jyslouey's picture
jyslouey

Could I add a small pinch or two of cinnamon to the raisins without affecting the yeast activity/dough.  Thanks so much for sharing this recipe.

Franko's picture
Franko

Either of the posted recipes would be OK with some cinnamon added . It's best if you add the cinnamon after the dough has come together in the mixer. Then add the raisins.

amauer's picture
amauer

I baked and froze some sourdough wheat to take to my sister's this weekend and was trying to think of one more thing to bring. This sounds great for morning coffee and toast! Andrea

flyboy912's picture
flyboy912

After fooling around  with so many variations, in or out, egg, milk, halfmilk, whatever, I have settled on a basic recipe that suits me and is adaptable for most of my family tastes. I kept after it until I developed this and the reason I did is because I grew up with my mothers baking and I think that she used the same basic bread recipe for lots of things, and they were all good. I will share it with you.


3 3/4 cups unbleached bread flour


1/4 cup whole wheat flour


1 teaspoon bread machine yeast


1 3/4 cup water


1/2 teaspoon salt


Mix until mixed, just until ingredients are incorporated, rest 10 minutes, stretch and fold a dozen times, cover, let rest until doubled, ( 1hr?) punch down, stretch and fold a few times, divide into two equal weight pieces, shape each and drop into appropriately sized pans, cover, let rise an hour or so until doubled, bake in oven at 425 for about 30 minutes. Works great, tastes great, is so simple I can remember it and so can whip it up without looking at a recipe. I do steam, cover for 15 minutes, score, depending on the mood. Steaming and covering for awhile will let you experiment with the crust to get what you want.


As to raisen bread, same as above, just add a handful, 1/2 cup or more, into the mix and do the rest the same. Simple, basic, delicious.


As to toaster ovens, mine works great with single loafs. I have done two loafs, but that may be pushing it. Too loafs of banana breads works good though. It is a large one and  I think that is important.

maybaby's picture
maybaby

http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/3740/honey-orange-prune-bread  it is nice and moist without being too sweet. All you'd have to do is replace the prunes with an equal amount of raisins.


The first slice off of this loaf I immediately thought of the sliced turkey I have in the fridge and how it's lightly sweetened fruityness would go great with the turkey.

Aussie Pete's picture
Aussie Pete

Welcome KJ,


I hope you find a good raisin loaf reciepe. Just recently we were away for a week in a little coastal village and we popped into a health food cafe for brunch. It was a bread bakers delight with the different flours, oats corn and other bread ingrediants for sale


I ordered a slice of a standard raisin toast with my coffee as did my wife. "Sorry, we don't sell raisin toast but we do have a homemade sourdough fruit loaf" they suggested to us. We accepted.


What we recieved surprised us. We identified the following rough chopped dried fruits and nuts:- Apricots, dates, figs, raisins, apple and almonds. The fruit had obviously been soaked before being mixed into the dough as the pieces were very moist. There was also a hint of cinnamon in the taste and colour of the loaf. We had not seen or tasted such a fruit bread before and we thoroughly enjoyed it. It was so filling that we could only manage one slice each. We liked it so much that we went back 2 days later and had it again.


I don't have the recipe but I kept a mental note of the fruit and nut ingredients and having a sourdough starter at home I knew what my next bread challenge was going to be. I will start by soaking the dried fruit and knead it in with the sourdough and start from there.


I just thought if you find a recipe that you like for your raisin loaf you may like to try adding some of the other fruits sometime further down the track. Your posting reminded me of that morning coffee and fruit loaf slice so I thought I would share it with you and others who may want to try baking it.


Good luck as you should find many reciepes and ideas on this wonderful friendly site.


...............Pete


 

breadmantalking's picture
breadmantalking

As luck would have it, I have scheduled a posting on my blog for raisin bread in a few days. Try this recipe and see if it comes closer to what you're looking for. You will find it online on the blog on July 11. In the meantime here's the text from the posting.


Hope this helps,


David


www.breadmantalking.blogspot.com


 


 


 


When I think back to 'food memories' from my childhood, several kinds of bread stand out. One is a dark, crusty rye bread baked at 'Bernie's Bakery' around the corner from my grandfather's house. We would go there, on Sunday mornings and load up with all the fresh baked breads hot and fresh. Right out of the oven. I grew up in rural northeastern Canada, in Nova Scotia. This is a place of long, cold winters and short, not too warm summers. This is a place of comfort foods specially made for the cold climate we lived in. Where many of the locals were first, or at most, second generation Canadians, coming from immigrant European backgrounds. Bernie, himself was Polish and many others were from Russia, the Ukraine, Germany Italy and lots of other places. One of my fondest childhood memories is of sitting in our family kitchen eating freshly toasted raisin bread slathered with butter and/or peanut butter (I admit it, I'm hooked on PB!) and my mother's homemade strawberry jam. A lot of water has passed under the bridge since then, of course, but my mother still makes the jam, and I make raisin bread to put under it. It shouldn't take more than a few hours from start to finish.


 


Here's what you'll need for 2 loaves:


 


1 cup milk or water (milk makes softer richer bread)


6 tbsp shortening or butter (butter makes softer richer bread)


1 cup warm water


1/4 cup sugar


1 tbsp active dry yeast


2-1/2 tsp salt


6 cups bread flour, about


1-1/2 cup raisins, add after 1st rise


1 cup coarsely chopped walnuts (optional but great)


 


Here's what you'll need to do:


 


1. Warm the milk/water and the shortening/butter in asaucepan over low heat until it all melts and combines. Do not let it come to a boil. Then let it cool to barely warm.


2. Add the water, sugar, yeast, salt and half the flour (about 3 cups) to the milk mixture and mix well. Slowly add the remaining flour, 1/2 cup at a time, until you have a soft dough that is not sticky.


3. Knead the dough on a lightly floured surface for about 8 minutes.


4. Place the kneaded dough in a lightly greased bowl, turning to coat, and cover. Let it rise until doubled, about an hour.


 


5. De-gas the dough then roll it out into a rough rectangle, spread on the raisins and the walnuts (if using) and then knead them into the dough until they are evenly distributed. Continue kneading for another 5 minutes or so.


6. Divide the dough in half and form each half into a loaf shape the length of your loaf pans. Place each loaf in a lightly greased loaf pan, cover and let them rise until doubled, about 1/2 hour.


 


 


7. Bake at 375 degrees F for 50 minutes or until bread sounds hollow when tapped.


 


Make sure to remove the bread from the pans, and let the loaves cool on a rack. If you leave them in the pans, they will get soggy. Enjoy!!


 

jyslouey's picture
jyslouey

This sounds delicous.  I may try this out but will half the ingredients for the first time just in case I screw up.

davidbweiner's picture
davidbweiner

jyslouey:


 


even when you screw up the raisin bread, it still tastes great! One of the nice things about bread, When the shape is a little off or even when it's a bit dry it's still delicious. Finally it becomes tasty bread crumbs!


Glad you liked the recipe. Have a great day,


David at:  breadmantalking.blogspot.com

amauer's picture
amauer

off topic, but it is a place I have always been very interested in, and not just because I actually like cold weather.


Also, one of the best books I have ever read for it's beautiful writing is "No Great Mischief" by Alistar MacLeod. I will check out your blog spot and copied your recipe. Thanks! Andrea

davidbweiner's picture
davidbweiner

Glad you liked the recipe! Let me know how it came out.


Have a great day.


David at: breadmantalking.blogspot.com

rsherr's picture
rsherr

David, 


Enjoyed your post on raisin bread and my interest picked up even more on reading about your growing up in Nova Scotia as I've been living on Cape Breton Island for the last 35 years.  I've been using Peter Reinhart's raisin bread recipe with the addition of a bit molasses which I learned from one of our neighbours.  I find it's a nice flavour boost.  Today I made two more loaves and decided to just dump the raisons in when I mixed the dough (by hand) rather than rolling it out and placing the raisins in afterwards.  Seems to have worked fine and eliminates that extra step.   I'll be interested in reading yours when it's posted.  


Very nice web site too. I've subscribed.


Best,


Richard

jyslouey's picture
jyslouey

May I ask how much molasses to use and is this in place of the sugar (I have a similar recipe for raisin bread but it uses sugar only.  Would this be the same if I used malt extract? Will the extra weight of the raisins not interfere with the first rise? I'm also thinking of tossing the raisins in a bit of powdered cinnamon when I knead or should the cinammon be added after the first rise?  Thanks for any advice you can give.

davidbweiner's picture
davidbweiner

Richard:


Where do you live on Cape Breton. I grew up and was born in Sydney. When I visited in 2007, I stayed at my cousin's place in Main a Dieu near Louisbourg. It was cold in September, but beautiful.


 


David at: breadmantalking.blogspot.com

amauer's picture
amauer

Here I am thinking about how nice it would be to be in Nova Scotia and the book I love is set on Cape Breton Island! I live in Minnesota and the summers are so hot and humid, as it is right now, so I imagine somewhere where a sweater in the summer would be standard attire. I was in San Francisco a few years ago and it was spring about 55-60 and rainy and people ran around with full parkas on as if it was dead on winter. Back on topic....I use molasses in several breads I make. It is a nice boost, as you say. Andrea

davidbweiner's picture
davidbweiner

Hi Andrea:


 


Nova Scotia is like that, only colder. Sweaters in  summer and parkas in winter. On topic, you can try any sweetener to good effect in the bread. Brown sugar will make the bread richer. Honey will make it soft and supple as well as rich. Here in Jerusalem we have something called silan, which is date honey. It is dark like molasses but not as thick. It is wonderful in brown breads. Better stocked supermarkets might have it or if there is a Middle East grocery. It's worth the effort to look for it. I have found that when I experiment with bread, even when it fails, I learn how to do better next time.


And I get to eat the failures too!


Hope this helps,


All the best,


David at: breadmantalking.blogspot.com

rsherr's picture
rsherr

IJyslouey - For 700 grams of flour I use 3 teaspoons of sugar and then dribble some molasses in.  Hard to say how much, probably about 3 tablespoons worth of dribble but you may have to experiment with it a bit.  Really does give a flavor boost.  I put the cinnamon (1 1/2 teaspoons in with the salt and sugar - it's never caused a problem that I can detect - 1/4 cup of dry milk and the yeast when I first mix up the dry ingredients.  Then the molasses, a few tablespoons of butter  and an egg.  I've never tried malt extract.  


I was a bit concerned too that putting the raisins in when I added the water would interfere with the first rise but it caused no problems at all, I'm happy to say, so no more rolling out the dough and sticking raisins on it after the first rise for me.   I knead my dough by hand using Peter Reinhart's method in Artisan Bread Every Day - an excellent book.  Only takes a few minutes to knead it.  If I have the time I then put it in the fridge overnight and let it rise there (I always do that with French bread which needs a slow rise to develop flavor) but if I'm in a hurry I set it on the table and it's usually risen fine by the afternoon.  


Andrea - Sorry to hear you're boiling in Minnesota.  For us the mid 80's constitutes a heat wave and we only get a few days of that a summer.  No matter how hot it gets during the day nights are refreshingly cool.


Best,


Richard


 


 

jyslouey's picture
jyslouey

Thank you Richard for the advice.  I'm going to try this out soon.  There's so many recipes that I'd like to try but so little time as I can only bake during the weekends.  I noticed in your post you mentioned 700 grms of bread flour which I can easily half (and perhaps mix in 100 grms of wholewheat flour instead of all white bread flour) However I noticed that you did not use any water.  Do I need to add water or is the butter and egg sufficient?  It will be quite a sticky dough wiith the butter, molasses and egg.  In the past when I made my wholewheat loaf, I would dissolve the malt extract in the water so that it's easier to handle.  I would also add the cinnamon to the flour as it would be difficult to incorporate this into the kneaded dough to ensure that it is evenly distributed.  I just hope that the spice will not interfere with the yeast.


I mix everything by hand as I don't have a mixer.


Judy

rsherr's picture
rsherr

Sorry Judy. I should have added that I use a scant 2 cups of water in this recipe. You can of course use some whole wheat flour but you may have to adjust the water a bit.  I mix the dough with a big spoon and my hands for about a minute and then let it rest for 5 minutes or so (lets the flour absorb the water better).  Then knead for about 3 minutes more adjusting the flour as necessary. Cinnamon won't cause any problem for the yeast.  I always mix mine with the flour. You can also dissolve the molasses in the water though I find it mixes in fine if I just pour it onto the flour.  I probably use a bit more than I said - 1/3rd cup or so.  Good luck.


Regards,


Richard

amauer's picture
amauer

I was going to say 1/3 of a cup, so we are close. That is besides the sugar. In Sweden I guess they use dark sugar beet syrup, so my sister bought me some at Ikea. So far, I have only used it with my Bran Muffins and that worked!


Richard, Your nights are similar to the weather at our cabin in Northern MN that I share with my siblings. It usually is lovely at night, but we have the MN mosquitoes. If the lake is breezy, they are not bad. Our winters are actually a little more harsh here than up North due to the forest keeping the snow from drifting as much. I live in corn and soybean county, bitter cold and winds with lots of drifting, so I get snowed in a fair amount, but just gives me more time to bake. Andrea

4.184kj's picture
4.184kj

Wow :) This site is awesome!  Got so many helpful responses.  Tough part now is to pick one to make first...so little time so many yummy breads


 


@LindyD and Franko


I would love to use my regular oven but with the summer heat it would make my home way too hot.  Even using the toaster oven increases the temperature.  I agree though, twice my bread has risen so high that it hit the top heating element and scorched the tops :) hehe quite funny.  But toaster oven does the job for now, even looking to see if I can find locally the toaster oven sized bread stone! :)


@Franko


Thanks for the recipe!


When shaping loaves, I have this problem where the raisins would poke out and tear the dough.  Then I would go and try to reshape it and in the end I've touched the dough too much that the bread comes out tough.  Do you get a tight surface tension with these raisin dough?  Or is there a way to mix the raisins they don't fall out when shaping?  It could be I add the raisins in the final shaping.  I'll try adding it in during final mixing stage.


 


@flyboy912, maybaby, breadmantalking


Thanks for the recipes! 


 


@Aussie Pete


Ohh good idea!  That reminds of this bread we really like at a bakery in Toronto, Cobs bread.  It has dried apricots and currents in it.  But adding dried figs, cherries and cranberries, would be a great idea...mmm yum


 


 

Franko's picture
Franko

When I make a dough that is incorporating fruit or nuts I tend to make the dough on the slack side. It's much easier to mix in raisins if they don't have to fight the dough. Once you have the dough at it's final stage and it's at medium soft consistency you can mix in the fruit by hand or if you're using a mixer just keep it on 1st speed and work them in carefully without letting them shred or tear. Finish the process by hand if it's just a small batch. Some raisins will usually poke out a bit so just pick them out if they're right on the surface and try to rework the blemish (not the loaf) out of the surface. A raisin partially sticking out here and there is not neccessarily a bad thing anyway. A lot of raisin bread recipes call for IMO way to many raisins which makes this particular problem even worse. If your not happy with the look of your loaves cut back the amount of raisins until you get a loaf you're happy with. Less is more for these breads.

breadmantalking's picture
breadmantalking

Hi there!


 


I just published a nice raisin bread recipe on my blog. Check it out at:


http://www.breadmantalking.blogspot.com/2010/07/raisin-bread-goin-on-sentimental.html


David at: breadmantalking.blogspot.com

rsherr's picture
rsherr

Judy,


I started making some more raisin bread today and realized I gave you a wrong steer on the water.  I just use 1 2/3 cup - not 2 scant cups.  Even then I sometimes add a bit more flour while kneading as it's a pretty moist dough.  Btw, If you can fine Lexia raisins where you are, they are superb and will improve your raisin bread all by themselves.  They're much larger than normal raisins and rather sticky but delicious.


Best,


Richard

jyslouey's picture
jyslouey

Richard,


I spent the weekend converting the recipes above into grams (my scale is in grams only) and even bought myself a bottle of molasses and a packet of Lexia raisins as suggested and and was all prepared to make the raisin bread.  However  I reaslised that there was no mention of the qty of yeast to use for the 700 grms of flour  (I use SAF instant dry yeast) .  Moreover, on reading your post, I realised that you use the stretch and fold method and also kept the dough in the fridge overnight (as per PR's method in his book which I also bot recently).  I gave up as I've only ever used the normal kneading method and would proof the dough in room temp. for 1 hr or more, shape and then proof for another hr before putting in the oven.  I didn't know what I should do after taking the dough out of the fridge, do I leave it to return to room temp, shape and then bake or do i need to give it a second proof before going in the oven? 


Coincidentally the baking class that I attended this Sat. also happened to be a raisin loaf but I was quite disappointed with the outcome.


Here's the recipe and  the final product:



The recipe uses 250 grams of bread flour mixed with 250 grms of AP flour, 1 egg, 25 grms of butter, 100 ml milk and 175 water, 2 tbsps sugar and 7 grms of dry yeast. The total weight of the risen dough came to 930 grm and I divided this into three smaller balls.


The bread looks fine here, it's soft and light although the texture of the crust and the crumb was not what I had expected.  The top was golden brown but the sides that were in the loaf tin were not brown enough and just felt crumbly and not chewy and tasted quite bland. I wonder if it had to be the mixture of the flour...would it have been better if had been 100% bread flour (in which case a little more water may be needed?) 


I'm going to give this another try with molasses and cinnamon next time using 100% bread flour based on David's recipe and see if I can get a better tasting bread.


 

rsherr's picture
rsherr

#mce_temp_url#Hi Judy,


I should have posted my whole recipe instead of dribbling it out. Basically it's Peter Reinhart with a few variations.  I only weigh the flour as the other ingredients don't seem to need it.  Here it is:


700 grams of all purpose flour


1 1/2 tsp salt


1 1/2 tsp cinnamon


3 tsp of sugar


1/4 cup of dried milk


2 tsp instant yeast


I mix all these together with a whisk. Then I add


1 egg


2 or 3 tbsp of butter


About 1/3 cup of molasses


1 1/2 cup of raisins


Scant 1 2/3 cups of water


Mix it with a spoon for about a minute.


Let it rest for 5 minutes


Knead by hand for about 3 minutes.  I usually have to dip my hands in flour a few times so the dough ends up tacky but not sticky.  


If I'm in a hurry I bake later that day after the dough doubles in size.  30 to 40 minutes at 350 degrees or until the internal temperature reaches 185-190. But you can also put it in the fridge after kneading and before any rising for up to 4 days and then form and bake.  


The way I knead I learned from this video by Richard Bertinet.  He's doing sweet dough but I use it for all my dough.  I'm not nearly so good as he is, of course, and my dough is dryer and I use flour on the counter instead of oil but I find the kneading technique easier than the push and turn.


 


Forgot the link for the video.


www.gourmet.com/magazine/video/2008/03/bertinet_sweetdough


Regards,


Richard


 

jyslouey's picture
jyslouey

for taking the time to re-type the whole recipe.  I really appreciate your effort.  I have just finished reading Dough by Richard Bertinet.  The book comes with a DVD of his kneading method and I would very much have a go at it too.  I tried it at the baking class but was reprimanded by the tutor and I had to revert to the traditional kneading method.  In the event that I fail at the RB kneading method, I can go back to normal kneading right? (may probably take longer if the dough is wet) and I can just prove ths in room temp and then bake.  It's very warm in HK right now so it's the pefect environment for proofing.  I know I'll be worrying and getting up the the whole nite to check the dough if I had to leave it in the firdge. :)  I can't wait to try out yr recipe this weekend.  Thanks again.


Judy

jyslouey's picture
jyslouey

I have finally made the raisin bread using the s&f method.  I don't know if I've done it correctly though.  It's my first time to experiiment with this method. I tried using the R. Bertinet french folding method but as it was only a small mass of dough there wasn't much to slap around wiith and I used Reinhart's s&f method in the end. 


I halved yr ingredients with the exception of the milk and water as I used bread flour instead of AP so I thought I would need a little more liquid, I used 220 ml. plus half an egg and 2 tbsps of melted butter.  The smell from the molasses and the cinnamon is just great.  As it is very hot here in HK I noticed  the dough  started to rise a little while I was resting for 10 mins in between folds (approx 1 hr in total for the s&f and resting)   I put the dough in the fridge at 11:00 p.m. and after 1 hr it has already doubled in size.  I'm now  worried that when morning comes, it may have over-proofed. I can already see myself getting up all nite checking on the dough.   I do hope it turns out fine,  otherwise I may have to revert to the normal kneading method that I'm familiar wiith and just let it proof in room temp for 60 - 90 min. in future. 


As for the raisins, I think I can add this after I have degassed the dough. In the event that the dough is a failure,  at least I won't have wasted the raisins.


Regards,


Judy

jyslouey's picture
jyslouey

Thanks Richard,


I did compare yr recipe  to my other recipes from my cooking class   (in a smaller qty at 500 grms of bread flour mixed with a bit of AP flour)  school) and thought it was quite a lot of water but I've never handled anything more than 500 grms of flour so I couldn't be sure so thanks so much for the timely clarification.  As soon as I have time to make this, I promise to post a pic. here.  Hopefully I can find time to do it this weekend...stay tuned.


Judy

davidbweiner's picture
davidbweiner

Richard:


Nova scotia is one of the world's prettiest places, especially Cape Breton Island. It is still rugged, cold in winter (-20F sometimes) and lots of snow because it's basicallt a rock in the middle of the North Atlantic. I went for a family visit in 2007 for the first time in many years and was enchanted all over again.  have many, many fond memories. Glad you enjoyed the raisin bread recipe. And, of course, thanks for subscribing. Please pass the address along to whoever might be interested. I love baking, especially bread. I always feel there is more to learn and so I experiment. Have a good day!


David at :  breadmantalking.blogspot.com

rsherr's picture
rsherr

David:


I don't go to the Sydney area much since where I live, on the southwest edge of Cape Breton Island between Port Hood and Judique and inland off the coast road about 4 miles, Halifax tends to beckon more.  In the middle of the woods more or less but with 30 acres of fields around.  Moved here 35 years ago and have never wanted to leave. Well, maybe an occasional trip but no more. 


Best,


Richard

davidbweiner's picture
davidbweiner

About 35 years ago, on my honeymoon I took my new wife on a road trip to Cape Breton so she could see where I grew up. She's from Baltimore in the States. I remember vividly going down some unpaved road (then) near Mabou. I probably passed by your house!


Regards,


David

rsherr's picture
rsherr

You probably did, David.  Next time let us know and stop by for a visit.  We'd love to meet you.


Best,


Richard


 

amauer's picture
amauer

I did add some of my white sourdough starter, but otherwise followed it. The loaves are really beautiful and smooth looking, but they haven't fully cooled. Can't wait to try it!


I also made a whole wheat sourdough (the 1:2:3 type recipe), but added a cup of buckwheat flour too. I keep fooling around with different flours and add ons. They look good, but not sure what the buckwheat will do to the taste. I like the pancakes though.... Andrea

breadmantalking's picture
breadmantalking

How did the raisin bread come out?


 


David at:  breadmantalking.blogspot.com

amauer's picture
amauer

Thanks for the recipe. It turned out great! I took one to work and one for myself. I added pecans instead of walnuts and next time I think I'll go with walnuts. They give it more flavor. I also added cranberries with the raisins. A very pretty bread with a nice smooth texture! Andrea

breadmantalking's picture
breadmantalking

You didn't mention if you had also cut the amount of yeast in half. This would be especially important since it is so hot in HK. Let the dough be your guide. It might be wise, in future, to cut the yeast to 1/4 if you're going to have a long rise overnight. Or, as you suggested, maybe the best thing is the traditional 60-90 minutes rise at room temp (since it's so hot). In any event, always add the raisins after the first rise. The raisins also have some sugar and liquid in them and therefore they will encourage the rising!! If you use a machine to mix, then they should be added after the rise because they can get chopped up by the machine or at the very least, if that doesn't happen they will color the bread and encourage rising. (BTW, the same goes for sun-dried tomatoes! that will color the dough although not really encourage the rise). Anyway, hope this works out. Let me know what happened.


Regards,


David at: breadmantalking.blogspot.com

jyslouey's picture
jyslouey

as well, using 1 tsp. which is approx 4 grms.  If after I've degassed the dough and it feels right, I will then add the raisins.  i will def take pictures of the dough surface and the outcome in the morning.  It is now 3:00 a.m. 


After eight hrs in the fridge, this is what the dough looks like...I think it has collapsed, or is there still hope? I'm waiting for return to room temp before I knock it down. I am devastated...


All is not lost...it turned out much better than I had expected. The crumb is soft and fluffy and felt like real bread with proper developed gluten.  The only drawback is that I lacked confidence and didn't put enough raisins in the dough. In fact it was better than the one I made this past Sat. with AP and bread flour...dang!!!  I must thank Richard and David for the recipe and all the help they have given me here.  I think the s&f method is wonderful and I shall try to use more of this this technique in future.


 



jyslouey's picture
jyslouey

using slightly more molasses, raisin and cinnamon, 90 mins first rise, approx 45 second rise. Maybe I shouldn't have scored the top though...


rsherr's picture
rsherr

Looks very good.  I never score the top of my raisin loaves.  How does it taste?

jyslouey's picture
jyslouey

I'm glad I put slightly more cinnamon and molasses this time.  I eat it with a little butter and it's nice and fluffy.just like store bought  I just hope it remains soft and fluffy tomorrow.  The one I made on Sat. morning is a little stale already.  I try to spray a little water, wrap it with tin foil and heat it up in my toaster oven and it's still edible, but not half as nice as fresh bread :) .  This will be my permanent formula for raisin bread although I wouldn't mind adding a bit of ww flour, if that doesn't change the taste too much.Thanks again for the recipe.  I would not have known to use molasses if it wasn't for your suggestion. 


Best,


Judy