The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Atta flour

drdobg's picture
drdobg

Atta flour

I have been experimenting with "atta" flour called for in many Indian flatbreads (such as naan, poori, chapati breads, etc.)  It seems to me it would be similar to some of the higher ash flours of french baking.  Can anyone give some insights to the similarities and differences of these flours?

Mebake's picture
Mebake

Atta flour is a stone ground indian durum hard wheat that has typically 11.5-13% protein content. It is high extraction, i.e. large bran particles sifted, but retains enough fiber and nutrients. Atta is usually 95% extraction.

French type flours used for artisan baking is higher in ash than comparable white flour, but is not very high in extraction (i think). It depends on which grade of artisan flours you seek. The protein ratio is about the same as indian durum.

As for baking, protein qualities are what is important in the final dough feel. Having worked with indian chakki atta, it is not bad for artisan breads either, and could replace french flours with some breads, given that you adjust water according to absorbtion level of durum atta.

Khalid

drdobg's picture
drdobg

Thanks for your insights.  I appreciate getting to benefit from other bakers' experience and knowledge. Did you feel that water absorption is higher with atta flour as compared to other artisan flours?  Comparable to a whole-wheat flour?

Mebake's picture
Mebake

YES, i believe atta is more hygroscopic than french artisan flours which invariabley fall under the medium-soft wheats.

Khalid