The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Gummy Centers

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Spattznatt's picture
Spattznatt

Gummy Centers

Greetings everyone,


 


I have been having a consistant problem with my bread. I am using the white dough receipe from: "Dough:Simple contemporary breads" by Richard Bertinet. I make a raisin bread in a boule shape and cook it on a baking stone. I preheat the oven to 475 then add boiling water to a pan in the bottom of the oven. Because of the middle being gummy I most recently decreased the temp to 425 after. Cook for about 20-25 minutes or until top is golden brown. The gumminess has improved some but still is a problem. Sorry for the lack of pictures. Will try to make another loaf today or tomorrow. Will update once I have the pictures.


 


Thanks,


S

Tuirgin's picture
Tuirgin

In many of the recipes from The Bread Baker's Apprentice there is a target internal temperature. There was one time I was making bread that the bread was just taking forever to reach the internal temperature. I ended up taking the bread out while the internal temperature was 5-10ºF below the target. My fear was that any longer and the outside of the bread would be burnt beyond saving. Two hours later I cut the bread and found that the inside of the bread was slightly gummy. The same bread didn't quite rise to expectation—perhaps it was under-proofed or perhaps I didn't develop the gluten enough. Either way, I believe it was the density which caused the internal temperature to be so sluggish.


Christopher

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven


My fear was that any longer and the outside of the bread would be burnt beyond saving.



A sure indicator that the oven should be turned down a notch.  The right oven temperature is a balancing act, but if it's not done inside and the outside is too dark or burnt, then the temperature is too high.  The opposite is also true if the inside is done and the outside too light and colorless, then turn up the heat. 


The temps are recommendations, many ovens are either a little cooler or warmer and some are spot on.   No one breaks any laws when  making an adjustment for a cool or hot oven.  :)

Tuirgin's picture
Tuirgin

That's what I figured. Next time I'll turn down the oven. Of course, with my oven, that's no guarantee there will be a temperature change. It has a life of its own. :P  

KNEADLESS's picture
KNEADLESS

When I first started making the NY Kneadless bread I had a few loaves with gummy centers even though the internal temperatures were 205. I now reduce the oven to 400 degrees when I take the lid off.  Secondly, I wait till the center of the bread is 215 degrees.  It solved my problem.

Nancy Baggett's picture
Nancy Baggett

Having worked a lot with the moister no-knead breads in creating the recipes for my Kneadlessly Simple book, I can agree that these doughs take longer than normal to bake through. The above suggestion to bake to 215 degrees F is right on. I suggest 210 degrees F for many of my recipes.  This means that it's often necessary to bake at a slightly lower temp (so the outside doesn't burn) than normal and/or cover the loaf near the end of baking. Another thing to keep in mind: the long, slow rise of my breads or the NYTimes type of breads encourages a lot of enzyme development, which causes deep crust browning. So, it's important not to judge doneess just by looking at the outside--that's deceiving. You've got to check the loaf center with a skewer, thermometer, etc.

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

.

LindyD's picture
LindyD

S, how long do you allow the bread to cool before cutting it?


Most breads need several hours to completely cool.  Removing the bread from the oven doesn't mean the baking is over.  Not quite.


Proper cooling (on a wire rack) allows the excess water to evaporate from the interior of the loaf and the crumb to firm up.  That evaporation continues for up to three hours (or more, depending on the size of the loaf).

Nancy Baggett's picture
Nancy Baggett

Mini-oven, to clarify, I was saying that the internal temp of the loaf should rise to 210-215 F, not C. I believe that Kneadless was referring to this when posting, too. The oven temp might be 400 to 425 F depending on the recipe.

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

Mini

diverpro94's picture
diverpro94

Go ahead and keep baking it. If the top gets too brown, then put some foil over it. I've had to do that with a couple sourdough miches.

Spattznatt's picture
Spattznatt

Everyones comments have been great. I will try an instant read thermometer on the next loaf. I still have not make the wonderful crisp crust yet (some days better than others). If I turn down the oven temp, will I even have less of a chance of having the crisp yummy crust?


S