The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Help with Sourcing Organic Wheat Berries in the UK

aharcup's picture
aharcup

Help with Sourcing Organic Wheat Berries in the UK

Hi

can anyone help me with sourcing Organic wheat berries in the UK. I live in Berkshire and I am having a hard time finding orgainc wheat berries to grind into flour for my bread machine.

Thanks for any help with this

Regards

Andy

helend's picture
helend

Try this link http://www.browfarmwheatproducts.co.uk/bread_wheat.htm.

I haven't used them but have heard they are OK.

 Also my local health food shop sells them but in rather small quantities - I will ask their source next time I'm in there.

HelenD 

aharcup's picture
aharcup

Thank you very much for that quick reply Helen. I can now order my Schnitzel Vario grain mill :-) yippeeee

Andy

"Difficulties are opportunities to better things; they are stepping stones to greater experience. Perhaps someday you will be thankful for some temporary failure in a particular direction. When one door closes, another alway

andrew_l's picture
andrew_l

I buy mine from Rushall Mill, Rushall, Pewsey, Wiltshire, SN9 6EB. Tel : 01980 630 335.
The chap is extremely helpful, the grain is organic and he sells it in sacks - I transfer mine to a galvanized dustbin, small size, which keeps vermin out, and looks quite nice in the kitchen. One sack lasts about a year, I find, and costs around £8.00!!! I can't remeber the name of the wheat berries, but the bread is delicious and has a good rise - with sourdough.
He doesn't often answer the phone, but leave a message and he'll get back to you.
At Berkshire, you are a lot nearer than I am - Sussex! 

aharcup's picture
aharcup

That's fantastic value. I will be sure to call the guy for my next bag of wheat. Thanks for the help with this Andrew.
Andy
"Difficulties are opportunities to better things; they are stepping stones to greater experience. Perhaps someday you will be thankful for some temporary failure in a particular direction. When one door closes, another alway

jm_chng's picture
jm_chng

Wow, £8 for a years worth of flour? That really is good. It makes sense to grind your own grain at those prices. 

Jim

mountaindog's picture
mountaindog

You all now have me very interested in grinding wheatberries, for the superior flavor. Question: since the berries are whole, is that why they can last up to a year in a bucket in your kitchen without going rancid, as ground whole-wheat would from the oil in the germ? In New York we get extremely hot summers so I keep most of my ingredients refrigerated or in a cool root cellar if I'm not using it up right away.

 

Also, curious as to what kind of devices various people use to grind? I like the idea of hand-cranked mechanical rather than electric mills, but not sure how easy they are to use or how well they work. My sister uses an electric grain mill, she lives in Montana and is able to get very good locally grown wheat there, so she doesn't store it for very long. I'll have to ask her more about shelf life too.

 

I was looking at a website for a store in Pennsylvania Amish country that sells a lot of homesteading gear for people living off the grid, and was surprised at the number of different types of grain and flour mills they sell. Here is the link. I love this green Diamant mill but for $800 plus I would probably need to be grinding flour for an entire village to make that pay for itself!

 

weavershouse's picture
weavershouse

We ground grain in a handpowered mill for years but 3 years ago we bought an electric Nutrimill and I have to say I love it. It works like a charm and it's not too loud. It grinds about 11 cups of flour without making a mess. (I make more of a mess than it does). The flour does not get so hot that it harms the nutritional value. We love anything old-fashioned and hand done but if I had to grind all the flour I need for making bread (especially since finding this site!) I couldn't keep up if I was grinding my hand. Just my opinion, hope it helps. weavershouse

andrew_l's picture
andrew_l

I'm probably quite wrong, but I have been toid that the whole grain stays fresh for years - reputedly, some grain from an ancient Egyptian tomb was found , planted and grown. Sounds a bit improbable, but there you go!And when it is ground, it begins to oxidize and go rancid - same is supposed to be true of nuts - once they are shelled, they go "off" faster than when they are left in the shell.I don't know if it's true! But I DO know - from experience - that my years supply of grain keeps perfectly well and tastes great!I grind it with a grain mill attachment for my Kenwood Chef - I imagine there is a similar attachment for a KA?
Happy milling!
Andrew

mountaindog's picture
mountaindog

Hi Andrew,

 

Thanks for the info on the berries, makes sense that they would not spoil whole, just like many types of seeds that stay viable a long time. Yes, I was wondering the same thing about whether there was a flour milling attachment for the KitchenAid Pro 600 mixer. I do have a meat grinding attachment for it. I'll have to look on the KA website - or maybe Rena from Delaware knows, as she is a KA aficionado? Thanks for the inspiration to try milling!

pumpkinpapa's picture
pumpkinpapa

We have one cash cropper who did soft winter wheat last year. I got about 40 kg of wheat berries for free, but as he did get about $150.00 CAD /ton you can get a good idea of how little it does cost to get fresh wheat. Even if you gave twice that for a ton, which is far fairer than any price the farmer would ever get anywhere else, you are still way ahead. Generally grain farming is a drain on the finances but you have to do it if you want to continue farming.

So a ton is roughly 33-34 bushels which in turn is about 60 pounds which will yield about 42 pounds of flour.

Most often a farmer willingly will sell grain directly for a fair price. Makes sense for all grains.