The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Slap and fold (French fold)

sadears's picture
sadears

Slap and fold (French fold)

Just wondering...I've been kneading on a cutting board.  Could that be a reason I'm having trouble or could it be the dough is just too wet?

 

Steph

jm_chng's picture
jm_chng


You're dough's not too wet Steph. Follow my recipe step at a time, don't worry about it. Don't think too much about it. But make notes as you go so you can change one thing or ask about it. You're doing fine your last loaf looked good. 
Jim

sadears's picture
sadears

Does it matter, do you think, that I work on a board v. counter top?

 

Steph

sphealey's picture
sphealey

> Does it matter, do you think, that I work

> on a board v. counter top?

 

At the King Arthur Baking Tour class, the instructor made about 15 loaves' worth of dough in 2 hours working on what looked like a 14" x 18" wooden cutting board. (Spilled about 2 or 3 grams of flour off the edge of the board in the process - tsk tsk! ) Her doughs weren't quite as wet as Floyd's Daily Bread, but quite wet. So I gathered it is a matter of practice in relation to the surface.

 

That said, I will report again that I have found that Swanstone(tm) works quite well a dough-working surface; it seems to have just the right combinaton of smoothness and tooth for working with doughs. Plus it is a food-grade commercial surface so you can wash it off with anything you like. You could see if there is a Swanstone fabricator in your area and ask him to sell you a 16"x20" piece of scrap (the 1/2" or .400" thickness, not the 1/4"). Have him router the edges smooth.

 

sPh

jm_chng's picture
jm_chng

To be really honest Steph. I don't think it matters what the surface is you're working on. Mix a little, rest a while. fold a little. rest a while. fold again if you think it needs it but don't tear the dough. Let it rise til double. Use a spatula or something to ease the dough out onto a floured surface and cut  the amount of dough you need. Don't cut more than you have to, don't forget you're cutting the gluten. Let it rest a while. 15 mins to 30. Shape partly, let it rest. 15-30 mins. Final shape. Allow to rise. Bake. 
Jim