The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Is my theory correct?

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rolls's picture
rolls

Is my theory correct?

Hi, having jus finished watching this baguette video (ciril hitz): http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OI-WstoakmQ


and not being an expert or anything, I just had a thought. Looking at his dough, it didn't seem wet so guessing 70% or under even. But he still had heaps of gorgeous holes, okay his handling of the dough while shaping will play a part here, but I noticed he did a pretty long preshape, I think it was 45mins to an hour. So, my theory is, that its actually this long preshape and then gentle shaping (although he did degas a little), thaty actually caused all the holes rather than a high hydration% dough.


Does this sound right at all do you think? Is there an actual recipe out there?


Thanks heaps in avance :)

richawatt's picture
richawatt

it has to do with a couple things.  I feel that yeast has a lot to do with it.  When I use active dry yeast and I add it dry with the flour, I feel that it gives the bread a tighter crumb, so now I always disolve it in the water to help it get distributed evenly through the bread. Also try using a poolish starter.  Or try bumping up the yeast a little, but not too much because you will give the bread a yeasty flavor.  Another thing that plays a big part, is the heat.  You need a really hot stone, so it has a lot of heat to give back to get a good oven spring.  The pizza stones you get in the store are not good enough.  You should go to the home depot and buy some unglazed quary stones.  or go find some fire bricks, they sell ones that are one inch thick.  another is good steam, but that's always hard to get at home.  but out of all those things, I feel that having a good strong yeast or starter that is evenly distributed, and having a nice long ferment will give you the results you are looking for

rolls's picture
rolls

Thanks for that, I usually use instant and add it to the flour also, although, I have seen people proof instant also before using in a recipe. I agree with the long fermentation, thank you for suggesting the firebricks was going to look into quarry ties but will try this first. thanks again. I also know I need heaps of practice

richawatt's picture
richawatt

pritice makes perfect.  I made lots and lots of bread at home, almost a loaf a day for two years.  I read bread books and took notes like it was school, and now I am working in a bakery making sourdough and french variation breads.  I love what I do, and if you try really hard, you will get the results you want.