The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Different types of yeast?

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JessicaT's picture
JessicaT

Different types of yeast?

Can someone tell me what the difference is between yeast types? I was looking to buy instant yeast to make pita bread and noticed that there were "bread machine" yeasts, "pizza dough" yeasts and the obvious instant/active dry yeast. 

fancypantalons's picture
fancypantalons

It'll be very fine granules, but otherwise just straight yeast.  It's much more convenient than active dry, as you can throw it straight into your dry ingredients without having to worry if it will dissolve or not.

JessicaT's picture
JessicaT

I definitely enjoy using it. I was just wondering if there is a difference between "pizza" yeast and so on and so forth. I already instant yeast already. 

fancypantalons's picture
fancypantalons

Honestly?  No idea, but I *really* doubt it matters.  Yeast is yeast.  Some might have dough enhancers or something, but quite honestly, I wouldn't want that anyway.  Give me straight up instant yeast any day... if i want other stuff, I'll add it myself. :)



Heck, the skeptic in me wonders if it's just a lame attempt at product differentiation in order to increase prices.  After all, how better to trick the consumer into paying more for an otherwise fungible product, than to create fictional differentiations between product lines?

davidg618's picture
davidg618

I'm not now, nor ever have been associated with a yeast manufacturer, nor vendor; I'm not trying to sell you a particular yeast, nor endorse one. However, I'm moved to defend the honest yeast manufacturers and vendors, and especially their research teams that seek out different strains of yeast to work in different environments, or provide unique results.


I first became aware of the diversity among yeasts when I took up home brewing as a hobby, nearly twenty years ago. Wine making, a more recent hobby, has added to my appreciation of the men and women who study, evaluate and improve yeast strains. 


Although a long time baker, only recently i've learned there are men and women whose life-work is better understanding bread yeasts, commercial and wild. Over the years, of note, they've given us Active Dry Yeast, Instant Dry Yeast, and osmotolerant yeast--look it up if you don't know what it is. I especially raise my hat to the few who have ferreted out the fascinating world of yeast and bacteria symbiotics--we call it sourdough.


 


Yes, along with employing hundreds of hard-working men and women the yeast manufacturers and vendors try to make a profit. Yes, sometimes their marketeers and financial gurus may try to squeeze out a few more percentage points. I think that's one definition of capitalism.


At the end of the day we, yeast consumers, are the judges.   But, of course, consumers are consumers, just like yeast is yeast.


David G

Doc Tracy's picture
Doc Tracy

What is Rapid Rise yeast?

davidg618's picture
davidg618

What is the difference between fast-rising yeast "(RapidRise/Bread Machine Yeast) and Active Dry Yeast? 
RapidRise and Bread Machine Yeast are different strains than Active Dry Yeast. RapidRise and Bread Machine Yeast are grown with a higher level of nutrients and are dried to lower moisture content. The particle size of RapidRise and Bread Machine Yeast are finely granulated to allow complete hydration of the yeast cells during the mixing process. The Active Dry Yeast larger particle size should be dissolved in water to achieve complete hydration prior to adding to the mixer. In addition, RapidRise and Bread Machine Yeast contain ascorbic acid resulting in increased loaf volumes. "


This, and other things I've read, attest to similar attributes: Rapid Rise and Bread Machine yeasts are the same strain (different from active dry yeast strains), and enriched and processed differently, e.g., drier, smaller granules, allowing direct mixing into a bread's dry ingredients, and a single-rise dough regimen. I wouldn't recommend it for artisan breads, and especially cold retarded fermentation.


David G