The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Sourdough and metal-

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Doc Tracy's picture
Doc Tracy

Sourdough and metal-

Just a word of advice. Don't keep starter in anything with a reactive metal. That includes aluminum foil. My CROB (cinnamon raisin oatmeal bread blob) ate holes in the aluminum foil while retarding in the fridge during a long rest this week.


The stainless steel bowl (I'm pretty sure stainless is safe) is sure shiney now!

GlendaLynne's picture
GlendaLynne

I once proofed a batch of sourdough overnight in a cheap stainless steel bowl. At just one small spot the dough went a rather nasty grey where the dough had reacted with the bowl.  It was a cheap bowl, and I assume that the metal may have had a flaw at that spot.  I always use glass or plastic now.

EvaGal's picture
EvaGal

I discovered 15 years ago that if a stainless steel pot had charcoal"ish" burned on food that would take lots of time to remove manually, coat it with sourdough starter and leave overnight.  Voila!  A clean and shiny pan:>)  I believe it worked on copper too.  If your pots are expensive, experiment with a cheap one first.  Now, I wonder if anyone has tried this with sterling silver flatware?


EvaGal

PaddyL's picture
PaddyL

I'll have to give the copper bottom pots a workout with some starter now.   I never would have thought it could eat through aluminum foil, but I've got to admit, I've never used it with my sourdough breads.

rockfish42's picture
rockfish42

You just discovered that acid and the right two metals make a battery, I highly suggest not storing food in cast iron in contact with aluminum foil as another horrible and personal example.

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

Let's start with rye.  Vinegar cleans lots of things.  OH, a test for pH!  To the Question:  Is my starter sour enough?  The silver spoon has been coated for 5 minutes and so far nothing.


Hey wasn't that a crude Chem 101 experiment with aluminum stripes dissolved in acid?  I remember I caught hell for it.  I wouldn't want the changed metal in my dough, Tracy!


Mini

cyalexa's picture
cyalexa

I can't tell if you are joking or really looking for an easy way to clean your silver. If it's the latter, try this:


Choose a disposable aluminum pan of the appropriate size (or line your plugged sink with aluminum foil) and in it mix 1 TB salt + 1 TB water softener (eg. Calgon) per qt of hot water. Dip the tarnished items. Rinse and dry.


If you are joking, forgive me. I'm a bit dense when it comes to humor.

EvaGal's picture
EvaGal

Hi cyalexa,


I was half-joking:>) Thanks for the formula!  I'll have to investigate the cost of Calgon and aluminum disposable pans, roll up my sleeves and get to work.  I agree that detecting humor online is a perpetual problem.


EvaGal 

cyalexa's picture
cyalexa

The cost of the water softener/salt/aluminum technique may be more that the traditional silver polishing paste, I'm not sure. To me, the ease and speed of just dipping, rinsing, and drying makes it worth it. It also seems to be easier on the skin, I don't even wear gloves. When I make a batch I also use a cotton swab dipped in the solution to clean jewelery that contains stones set in silver - works great.


I've learned a lot from this site and am so pleased to be able to share something helpful!

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

I have 7 odd silver spoons, each darker than the first.  I got them gratis so I really don't care but I threw them into the dishwasher a couple of times and nothing.  I know about the alu & Tide trick.  No Tide.  (I also know how to polish silver but I also love to experiment.)  Water softener huh..!   Thanks!  I will line a small icecream plastic dish with alufoil and throw in a tablet Calgon for the washing machine and pour on some hot water.  Later:  It's not working so I add a heaping teaspoon of table salt, now it is working.


Mini


When I was a little girl, my aunt taught me the trick on the copper bottom pans with salt and vinegar.  If you have a nice patina, this method is brutal!  (and the solution coming off is poisonous)  I also clean calcium deposites with vinegar and salt solution, stronger and faster.


Which does come around to a reminder for mixing salad dressing, one should dilute the vinegar first before adding salt or risk too much "bite" in the dressing.  Use wood, plastic, or glass, not metal bowls for salad (or sourdough.)

JessicaT's picture
JessicaT

Alex, I do believe they are actually serious about this. Removing tarnish makes sense, because starters get their sour flavour from a more acidic Ph level.


If anyone is desperate enough to clean rust and such, using a splash of coke is a quickie way of cleaning things.