The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Artichoke Garlic Bread - Looking for a clone of Pescadero's Arcangeli Market's signature bread

undermind's picture
undermind

Artichoke Garlic Bread - Looking for a clone of Pescadero's Arcangeli Market's signature bread

South of Half Moon Bay on the California coast there's a market in Pescadero called Arcangeli's (Norm's) which is famous for it's artichoke bread.  It's pretty much amazing..


Now that I've been making all our bread from scratch, I'd love to try to make something similar to it..  I was wondering if anyone out there has given it a try..  It's a round moist garlic loaf which is studded with artichokes..  I'd even love to hear about a good garlic bread recipe..   I would say that this loaf is more moist than typical garlic bread I think of, probably because most are just french bread with garlic spread..   But it had a bit of an olive oil taste..  And the bag would actually have oily spots when you'd grab a hot loaf off their shelf.


Anyways, if anybody has a clone recipe or suggestions for a moist garlic bread I could do in a clay baker (LaCloche) that would be great!


Here's a link to the loaf..


http://www.normsmarket.com/store/artichoke-garlic-herb-p-846.html

PBMee's picture
PBMee

I have been developing a recipe for artichoke bread over the past couple of years. I use butter for my fat, mozzarella cheese, garlic powder, and coarsely chopped, thawed and drained artichoke hearts. Looking at the list of ingredients for your bread, I would say that you would need to add dried or fresh Italian herbs and sub in parmessan cheese. If you are interested, i will forward my recipe. I have not converted it to sour dough yet. I have experimented with a starter and it works well. Paulette.

undermind's picture
undermind

Awesome!  I PM'd you

PBMee's picture
PBMee

Didn't get PM but here is my recipe. I like artichokes, cheese and garlic; hence, my recipe plus I could not find another one. You know what they say about necessity being the mother of invention. And, I have this strange and often overwhelming  compulsion to improvise when I cook.


If you have a stand mixer, this dough can be ready to bake in 2 to 3 hours. I like to mix with cold water/milk with the first rise overnight in the fridge. This recipe easily doubles. I prefer garlic powder to fresh garlic because any garlic that rises to the top of the bread may become bitter in the baking process. I sometimes add grated lemon zest because I like that flavor with artichokes.


Great on its own. I like it  toasted and served with olive oil, salt, pepper, parmessan cheese and fresh herbs for dipping. Other possibilities . . . endless.


Paulette's Artichoke Bread


400 g unbleached AP flour


242 g of a 1:1 mixture of evaporated milk and water


1/2 tbls yeast


1/2 tbls salt


1/2 stick unsalted butter or 1/4 cup olive oil


2 tsp garlic powder or 2 - 3 cloves of garlic lightly poached (1 -2 minutes) and then finely diced


80 g of thawed, drained, coarsely diced artichoke hearts (if you are using canned artichoke hearts, I would cut back on the salt)


4 oz (1 cup) of grated mozzerella cheese


In the bowl of a stand mixer combine all ingredients but artichokes and cheese. Knead under hook for 7 to 10 minutes. Transfer dough to container and allow to rise until doubled (about 1 to 1 1/2 hr.)


On a lightly floured work surface, knead in artichoke hearts and cheese, for 3 to 4 minutes, using only enough flour to keep dough from sticking to work surface. Let dough rest 15 minutes.


Shape dough into a batard or boule, or whatever shape you desire. Let rise until double in bulk or about 45 mins to 1 hour.


Mist and slash, if desired, just prior to baking.


Bread is baked on a baking stone with steam (I use about 1/2 cup cold water in a heated cookie sheet) for 30 to 35 minutes at 400 degrees. You may want to set crumb using 5 min off/5 min with door ajar before removing bread from oven.


To adapt to your links ingredients I would add 1/2 tablespoon of good dried italian herbs or their fresh equivalents. And I would possibly sub in parmessan cheese although I like the flavor and texture the mozzerella gives the bread.


Leave out the artichokes and this makes a great garlic bread, especially if you sub with an italian cheese blend containing fontina.


I'm doing this from memory and I hope I haven't left anything out. Let me know if you have questions. Paulette. paulettemeehan@bellsouth.net


 


 

mmelaprof's picture
mmelaprof

This is GREAT!!!  Thank you so much for the careful measurements; I'm sure that made all the difference. I appreciate this online family that shares tips and recipes and comes to the rescue when needed. 

Since I didn't have any fresh artichokes available, I had to use canned.  I did not adjust the salt.  I made it twice and changed very little.  Here's what worked for me: The canned artichokes were quite damp, so I patted them dry and cut them into fourths. Used olive oil instead of butter, put half the grated cheese in the dough and sprinkled the other half on the rectangle that I rolled about 14" X 8".   Used 1/2 tsp.  garlic in a jar and spread it over the dough first, then the cheese, then the hearts cut into fourths and laid end to end  forming rows about every 3 inches apart.  I carefully rolled from the long side,  The pan was already greased with Crisco, so I turned the dough over to grease the top and tucked in the ends.  Cooked it 30 minutes the first time and 32 minutes the second time and liked the slightly browner crust better.  Brushed the top with melted butter.

FYI for others:  a can of artichoke hearts will make three loaves of bread; however, next time, I'm going to see what using half of them will do.  

 

ragreen's picture
ragreen

...except gawd I love Arcangelli's breads. I came here looking to see if I could find some info about any artichoke/garlic bread and what do I find! I'll let you know how it works out.

undermind's picture
undermind

Sounds good ragreen..


I'm anxious to hear if you come up with anything.  The Arcangeli's website does say what's in it, but it's hard to know how it comes together.


BTW, I've made your recipe a few times now PBMee..  It's very good.  I've made it a few different ways; the way described above, and also a modified version which was made in a La Cloche.  It's just different from the one at Arcangeli's.  Hard to describe exacty how..  :)


 

PBMee's picture
PBMee

Glad to know you enjoyed the bread. What changes did you make?

undermind's picture
undermind

I normally make artisan style bread with a crusty exterior.  I wasn't able to get that with this recipe, even when putting a pan of water in the oven or spritzing the loaf. 


My normal go-to loaf is a simple one that uses a sourdough starter and always turns out great with add-ins (such as raisins and pecans for an amazing raisin bread)  It's just 16oz flour (bread flour and whole wheat, I usually do 10/6 or 13/3), 1 1/2 c water, 1/4c starter, and 1 1/2 tsp salt.  This recipe is based on the no-knead sourdough recipe at Breadtopia.com.   So I just combined the recipes basically..  I used the no-knead recipe above and added the artichoke hearts, garlic cloves, and an italian cheese blend which was mostly parmesan.  I also replaced a 1/4 c of water with olive oil.   The dough was fermented for 18 hours, then I kneaded in the artichokes, garlic, and cheese. 


I baked the loaf in my La Cloche, which is a clay enclosure for baking bread.  It completely encloses the bread and gives it the crusty, old world exterior I like.  It's sort of like using a baking stone for pizza.  I roasted the garlic before hand and put them in whole.  The artichoke hearts weren't measured, I just put in the amount that "looked right".  They were coarsely chopped.


I think the next time I make the bread I will put all of the ingredients in at the beginning instead of adding the artichokes and garlic after the ferment.  The moisture of the artichokes seemed to prevent them from "become one" with the dough when kneaded in.  So the bread didn't have total "cohesion" when it was all done.  This was a very minor detail though..  It tasted excellent.   So I think it will be even better next time, and I will also expirement with the size I chop the ingredients..

PBMee's picture
PBMee

Sounds yummy. Since your recipe is so different from mine, I'm going to make yours and let you know how it turns out. Maybe I can trouble shoot why you are not getting the crust you want. I'll start today and try to post in the next few days.


A few preliminary thoughts: If you plan to knead in the artichokes and cheese at the beginning you may need additional starter (or commercial yeast) because the fat in the cheese may effect fermentation/rising. I have never added the artichokes for the first rise, mainly because I do not want to break them any more than necessary, so that I have larger chunks of artichoke. And, I believe the second kneading, although brief, is important to the development of the dough.


Make sure that your artichokes are well-drained and patted dry. Do not over-extend the rise with the artichokes, that will prevent them from having air pockets around them. This bread has good oven spring.


The fat from the olive oil and cheese added to your basic recipe may be causing the softer crust.

undermind's picture
undermind

The crust is fine on the bread..   I was referring to the way the crust came out on your original recipe.  There's nothing wrong with it, I just prefer it with the old world crusty crust.  It is really just a difference in recipes I think.   The crust on your recipe makes a more french bread type crust, while the recipe I posted makes more of a crusty sourdough type crust.


One reason I'm making the bread with the recipe I posted is because I prefer to use starter over yeast when possible.  This recipe gets very nice rise without yeast, and is a high moisture dough that has great crumb and requires no kneading.  I agree on the importance of kneading, but this bread is probably the only thing I make that I don't knead.  You couldn't knead it anyways unless you added more flour which would alter the bread.


A couple of notes if you plan to make the bread using the recipe above..   It's a very quick and easy process.  You simply combine all the ingredients until incorporated, then cover and leave on the counter 18 hours.  The 18 hours is just a suggestion, you can go longer or shorter if you want.  If you're making a straight sourdough, I use 1/8 c starter (instead of 1/4 c) and refridgerate for 2 days before about a day on the counter at room temp.  This develops the sour taste.  After the 18 hours, pull the dough and shape it into a rectangle and fold it inward onto itself 3 times, then again to make a sort of tight ball.  Let rest 15 mins, covered.  At this point it needs to be placed into the shape in which it's going to be baked.  I have proofing baskets for rounds and long loaves.   Let rise 1-3 hours until doubled.  If you don't have proofing baskets, then a round is a pretty good way to go because it can just be left in the ball shape and baked on a stone and covered.


This recipe is designed to be baked enclosed.  I use a La Cloche clay baker; some people use dutch oven, some people have even used pyrex.  As mentioned above, if it's a round it can be placed on a pizza stone, quarry tile, bricks, etc. then covered with something.  Bake at 500 degrees for 25 minutes, then uncover for 10-15 minutes.  Different ovens will affect results dramatically.  The key is the 25 minutes covered.  After that I usually eyeball it until it's done.   It will get pretty dark - that's good.  So you're looking for golden brown with dark spots.  It will be very hard and crusty, and tender on the inside.  You can take an internal temp to be sure..

ragreen's picture
ragreen

OK, in theory, tomorrow is the day. I started my sourdough sponge up a while ago, cooked off some medium sized chokes and roasted two heads of garlic. I'll mix some herbs up in a bit. Tomorrow, early, I'll go for it... let ya know how it works out. This is a very simple sourdough recipe (but makes a really nice loaf), so if it blows up I won't have a lot of time and material wasted.

ragreen's picture
ragreen

Took a little longer to get back than planned... anyway, the results were definitely hopeful. The sourdough loaf itself came out good... looked good, good texture. I need to include more herbs, a little lighter on the artichoke hearts (I used 4 small/medium ones, I think actually one large one cut into chunks would be just about right). I also need to work on a more even distribution of the veggies in the uncooked loaf. I'm thinking too, that instead of putting individual roasted garlic cloves in (I used one whole head), next time I'll take half of that and puree it, and mix it in with the first kneading, then add the remaining cloves at the second knead, when I put the artichoke in. I won't post the recipe here until it's out of the experimental phase, just to save people the grief.

southern grits girl's picture
southern grits girl

Since I'm too lazy to go to the store and get some artichokes, I'm going to try this with spinach. Kraft Foods has come out with a cheese medley that has cream cheese and its already shredded, so I'm going to use that as a sub. I'll let you know how it turns out.