The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Sourdough Challah - in the shape of Hungarian Celebration Loaf

txfarmer's picture
txfarmer

Sourdough Challah - in the shape of Hungarian Celebration Loaf


It's from "A Blessing of Bread", and many TFLers here have tried it with great success, I will just list the following two here (recipe can be found there too):


http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/14803/sourdough-challah-quota-blessing-breadquot


http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/4200/sourdough-challah-photos-recipe


 



Since sourdough challah takes a long time to rise (a 5 hour proof), I was able to try a more complicated braiding shape without worrying about overproofing. This Hungarian Celebration Bread shape is also from "A Blessing of Bread", basically two 4 braids at the bottom, with a 5 braids on top. A bit time consuming to divide, round, roll out, and stretch out 13 pieces of dough, but well worth it.



Light and open crumb, so soft, so rich. I absolutely love sourdough enriched breads. Contrary to some may think, sourdough taste doesn't get masked by all the eggs and oil, it lingers in the background and provides a "tang" note, emphasize and complement the rich flavor perfectly. Ever since the sourdough Pandoro that took me forever to make, my DH just can't eat any enriched breads without missing the sourdough flavor. He's finally satisfied again with this sourdough challah.



I proofed for 5 hours as the book instructed, but maybe another hour or two would've been better - the slight tearing between braids is a sign of underproofing.


 



We loved it enough that I made another one immediately after we finished this first loaf!

Comments

ananda's picture
ananda

Hi txfarmer,


beautiful looking loaf; not that easy to do, I imagine.


The plaited loaf prior to proof is a fantastic sight.


I realise you had a lot of control due to slow fermentation, but I just wondered if you would have got another hour of proof out of the loaf?   Maybe you would have lost some of the definition of the plait?


Magnificent looking bread, I have to say


Best wishes


Andy

txfarmer's picture
txfarmer

I wonder about the proofing time too. The thing with my firm starter is that it seems to have long lasting power during proofing. I've been playing with it for a month or so, all of my initial breads were under-proofed, even though I already extended the proofing time comparing to my liquid starter doughs. Haven't seen the limit of proofing power with this starter yet, seems like no matter how long I proof, it will get a lot of ovenspring. Curious to try to push the limit next time.

wally's picture
wally

I've been working on a 2-tier 3-braid brioche, and I'm really impressed at the build you accomplished.  Nice work (and a lot of work!).


Larry

txfarmer's picture
txfarmer

Thanks! These multi-tier braids are fun to make, aren't they?

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

I love this challah. I agree with your description of the flavor. As I mentioned in my blog entry on this bread, it is less sweet than many challah formulas, and my wife enjoyed that. She finds most challot too sweet for her.


I'm still struggling with knowing just when a braided loaf is proofed perfectly for baking too.


David

txfarmer's picture
txfarmer

Thanks David! I think proofing for braided loaf is easier with instant yeast dough. With sourdough, especially my firm starter, I have yet to see it "fully proof". ;P

wally's picture
wally

I have the same uncertainities with my two-tier, three-braid brioche loaves. A brioche braid in a bread pan doesn't present the same problems because it's relatively easy to meaure its rise. With unpanned brioche I find myself hovering over the braid with a yardstick trying to accurately measure its rise, something made more difficult on multi-tiered bread because a lot of the proof goes out and not up.  And finger poking is a no-no.


Larry

SylviaH's picture
SylviaH

It is work and a lot of different things have to all come into 'play' but I agree a lot of fun to braid.


Sylvia