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Need help with yeast questions

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liv2learn's picture
liv2learn

Need help with yeast questions

Hi everyone.  I need some help via understanding of the difference between Active dry yeast and instant yeast.  The recipe I am making called for 1/4 tsp instant yeast, all I had was active dry yeast and I add that (2 1/4 tsp) to water with sugar for my pizza dough.  I am attempting to make the no-knead Ciabetta bread which said use 1/4 tsp instant yeast added to the dry ingredients, then the water and mix.  Can anyone help me with this question of quanity and if they are interchangable and if they are how would I adjuct the amount to use.  Thanks you so much, I sure will appreciate your input.  Karen

wdlolies's picture
wdlolies

Hi Karen,


I use 5g of active dry yeast for 500g of flour.  If my recipe doesn't ask for sugar, than I don't add sugar and therefor don't proof my dry yeast with water and sugar.  I just rub it into the flour and than add the salt, water and if needed, oil.


Best Wishes from Ireland,


Wolfgang

liv2learn's picture
liv2learn

I will use 1tsp of dry active yeast with each 2.11 cups of flour in my recipe.  I can go ahead and add this directly to the flour and salt, mix around and then add the water and mix together.  As long as I am not using sugar in the recipe, I do not need to proof it so it matters not whether I use instant or dry yeast, is this correct, do I understand it clearly.  Thank you for reading this and for your time.  Karen

wdlolies's picture
wdlolies

Hi Karen,


I don't know about cups etc., you can go by using around 1% of active dry yeast to the amount of flour you use.  Even though nowadays people say you could basically rub yeast and salt together and it wouldn't do any harm, I still believe in being cautious and add salt as the very last dry ingredient to the dough.  With other word, flour, yeast, salt and other spices (if used) and liquids.


Let us know how you get on.


All the Best,


Wolfgang

wally's picture
wally

Hi Karen-


Instant dry yeast, unlike active dry yeast does not need to be activated in water prior to use.  You just mix it into the flour. This makes it appealing for a number of reasons, especially the fact that you don't have to set aside water in your recipe for yeast activation.


If the recipe calls for instant dry yeast, multiply the amount it calls for by 1.212 to arrive at the amount of active dry yeast you will need to add.  Remember to subtract the water you activate it in from the total quantity of water called for in the recipe.


Good luck!


Larry

liv2learn's picture
liv2learn

OK if the recipe calls for 1g or 1tsp of instant dry yeast and all I have is active dry in the jar I will multiply 1 times 1.212 and arrive at 11/4g or 1 1/4 tsp of active dry in place of the instant.  Is this correct?  Thank you for your assistance, I appreciate it.

wally's picture
wally

You can also go to the link that Mini posted which calls for a 20% increase in active dry over instant dry yeast when substituting the former for the latter (which is what a multiplier of 1.212 gives you).


Larry

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

The amounts are above.   Active needs to be mixed with hot water to dissolve the gel coating around the yeast.  Follow the temperature instructions on the package using water from the recipe.


http://www.thefreshloaf.com/faqs/baking/yeast


Mini

wdlolies's picture
wdlolies

Hi All,

I know it is widely believed to be the case and it even says it on the tin, but active dry yeast does actually not need to be activated.  I only use active dry yeast at home, since it is rather difficult for me to get hold of fresh yeast and I just add it as a dry ingredient to my flour, prior to the salt.  It works just fine.  Even Richard Bertinet, in his book "Dough", explains that there is no need to activate the active dry yeast.  You save yourself time by just using it as it is.  I use half the amount of dry active yeast to fresh yeast.  By the way, at the moment I happen to have some rare fresh yeast at home and I must say, the bread does not rise any faster with the fresh yeast, compared to the active dry yeast.  Oh before I forget, I don't proof fresh yeast either, I just rub it into my flour, just like the active dry yeast and it works fine.

All the Best,

Wolfgang

AndyM's picture
AndyM

I'm with Wolfgang - active dry yeast does not need to be proofed before adding to the dough.  As I understand it, in the early days of active dry yeast manufacturing, there was a fair amount of inconsistency.  Some batches of yeast were de-activated during production.  The home baker had no way to know if the yeast they bought was viable or not, so the recommendation was to proof the yeast first - put some yeast into some warm water with some flour or sugar, and look for bubbles to start to form.  If this happens, then they yeast has proven it is viable, and you can use it in your dough.  If not, then the yeast is dead, and you should try again with a different batch of yeast.


But those were the old days.  Modern yeast production is much more consistent, and the "dud" batches have virtually disappeared.  I've been using active dry yeast for about 15 years, and I have never had a single failure due to bad yeast (I did kill the yeast once by using too-hot water, but that was my fault, not the yeast's). 


Good luck,
Andy

RiverWalker's picture
RiverWalker

its funny how this issue is such a "thing".
I mean everyone seems to have these questions in the beginning, and the answers that can be found are not always consistent.

though, to try to add a little more consistency...

I agree that if the yeast has been recently effective, then theres no big concern. I would, though, proof it in the conventional way if its been a while since you've seen that bunch work well.

but yeah, like others here, I've had active dry yeast work just fine without even dissolving it here. it does seem a little faster to act, when its hydrated first, but its not critical.

but now I have some instant yeast that I keep in the freezer, and just mix it into the flour... and its very nice that its so tidy without any reservation for doing it that way.

liv2learn's picture
liv2learn

Thank you ALL for your valuable input. I am making this No Knead Ciabatta and it called for 1g or 1tsp of instant yeast.  I put 4 c, all purpose flour, 1 1/4 tsp salt, 2 1/2 tsp active dry yeast into the bowl, stirred then added 2 cups of tepid water, mixed it together, covered and am waiting 18-20 hours.  Have any of you made this?  Wish me luck.  Thanks again.

mrfrost's picture
mrfrost

What recipe are you following? Given the amount of flour here, and the fermentation period(rising period), typical no knead recipes that I see use about only a total of a quater(1/4) teaspoon of instant yeast. With this small amount of yeast and the long fermentation time, if active dry yeast was used, the quantity of yeast would not really need to be adjusted. You could make the adjustment; it would be a real small amount.


By the way, I believe 1 gram of yeast is about only 1/3 teaspoon. With 2 1/2 tsp, the yeast will ferment in an hour or 2, unless the dough is refrigerated almost immediately upon mixing.


Foodwishes.com(chef John) no knead ciabatta youtube video:


 http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YX_6l2bmvQI 

diah's picture
diah

Is there any different between instant dry yeast and active dry yeast.

liv2learn's picture
liv2learn

Good morning diah
I am writing to say that I am a baby when it comes to baking bread, and I had the same question yesterday.  The wonderful people in this forum posted and shared their wise words about it here, so I am rereading them and trying again as I learned 1/4 tsp instant is definately different than 2 1/2 tsp active.  My no knead ciabatta did not come out as anticipated yesterday.  Too much and wrong kind of yeast.  I am giving it another go today.  Happy baking.  Karen

wdlolies's picture
wdlolies

that your bread didn't turn out the way it was supposed to.  Do you want to talk about it?  What happened?


All the Best Wolfgang

noonesperfect's picture
noonesperfect

The two products use different drying methods with very different results.  There are more live/active yeast cells with instant yeast than there are in the same volume of active yeast.  Therefore, it takes more active yeast to get the same amount of yeast activity.  There are other differences as well (active may require rehydration prior to use, dead yeast cells in active yeast can impact the proteins in the dough, etc.).


Generally, I prefer to use instant yeast or sourdough, but you can get good results from active yeast too.


 


brad

RiverWalker's picture
RiverWalker

as said, there is some difference, from wht I've read i books and here, it seems like the difference is pretty small, but some people seem to be very strongly opinionated against active dry yeast.


personally I just use a little less instant than active dry, as one thing everyone seems to agree on, is that its a little more potent for volume than the active dry is.  and it turns out fine. but I've read people here say that they use them completely interchangably and get results.


I think for those of us who are relatively new to baking, the difference is too subtle to really notice that much,  where people who are more experienced and methodical and such, may be able to get everything else perfectly the same, and notice precisely what the yeast does differently or how it effects things differently.


 


 

diah's picture
diah

You are right Karen. I will reread again the forum posted. Even I may not no the different between these two yeast but I still do my baking. Infact I have learned alot from this forum. I begin to love baking after being the member in this site. You guys are great and helpful. Cheers to all.