The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Nutrigrain Mill!!

Doc Tracy's picture
Doc Tracy

Nutrigrain Mill!!

I'm so excited. I just ordered a new mill. I can hardly wait to start milling my own grains. Since I bake almost exclusively with whole grains this is a big deal for me. I've been ordering my flour out of state, about once or twice a month so I figure it will pay for itself in about a year.


There is a place very close to the house that sells grains in bulk so I'm pretty set, although I don't know if they have specialty grains like spelt, durum and kamut.


Now I just need to bake a bunch of whole wheat this week to use up the month old flour that I have. I'm refreshing my starter now, going to start some of my "1-2.5-3" loaves tonight.

Comments

sheri_b's picture
sheri_b

Please let me know how it works out for you.  That's the mill that I am planning on buying next month.  I've placed an order for Montana Wheat wheat berries from our NC coop which should arrive late May or early June.  I've never used a grain mill before, so please let me know if there are any tricks I need to know to get good, fresh, nutritious flour.  Thanks!

Doc Tracy's picture
Doc Tracy

This is the mill she uses for all the flour she sells. I'll bet she has a lot of information to give you. I found out after I ordered mine that she also sells hers without any shipping cost. I paid exactly the same price (also without shipping) for mine. If I'd known I would have gone with hers.


She also sells Universal Plus mixers.

sharonk's picture
sharonk

I'm also interested to know how it goes for you. I use a lot of small grains for my gluten free baking, amaranth, quinoa, teff, and I don't have the proper mill for those.


When I asked the company that sold Nutramill if it worked on those they said they didn't know...


 


Thanks,


sharon

Doc Tracy's picture
Doc Tracy

According to the manual, which I found online it does work for small grains and dry beans. What do you do with the amaranth and quinoa?

sharonk's picture
sharonk

Thanks for looking this up for me!


I use amaranth, quinoa and teff for baking gluten free sourdough bread for myself and my gluten free daughter.


I also teach gluten free bread baking class and sell a bread manual, actually 2 now, on my website. One is rice based and the other is rice free.


Presently I use a kitchen aid grain mill attachment for rice and buckwheat but the small grains just pass through almost unground. Then I got a Barista coffee mill which did the small grains pretty well but I can see the flour isn't as fine as it once was and I can feel the coarseness in the bread.


 


Thanks again,


sharonk