The Fresh Loaf

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A wonderful breadmixing tool you may already own

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bnom's picture
bnom

A wonderful breadmixing tool you may already own

I don't own a Danish dough whisk but I do own a flat whisk--a tool designed for sauce making. I've found that it not only does a great job of whisking the fond (the brownish bits at the bottom of the sauce pan) and incorporating all the elements of a sauce, it is a splendid bread mixing tool. This versatile tool is strong enough to mix the dough and starter (it does a great job getting into the corners of my smallish SD container). And, because it's made of stainless steel wire, is super easy to clean.


The one I have is made by Rosle (an excellent if spendier brand). I see that the Fantes site has both flat and Danish bread whisks for about the same price (but does the Danish whisks serve the dual purpose the sauce whisk does?).


I'd be interested in hearing from people who have both tools, to see if there is some significant advantage of one over another.


Flat whisk:



Danish dough whisk:



 


 

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

Hi, bnom.


The sauce whisk looks like a neat tool. I don't have that one, but I have other whisks and both the large and small Danish dough whisks.


The dough whisks are rather rigid. This has the advantage of effectively scraping off the last bits of flour clinging to the bowl while mixing a dough. The more flexible wires on my other whisks won't do that as well. I wonder if that's an issue with the Rosle whisk.


David

bnom's picture
bnom

My Rosle whisk has been rigid enough to do a pretty decent job of scraping the remaining bits of dough off the side of the bowl...although I've never tried to get it 100 precent off. I wonder how well the Danish whisks get into the corners of the square tubs I, and probably a lot of other people, use for our sourdough. I'd say that's a key advantage of the flat whisk.

SylviaH's picture
SylviaH

I have several wisks including the ones above and love and use them all the time.  The sauce wisk does a good job of reaching down into the pot bottom and sides.


Sylvia

althetrainer's picture
althetrainer

I have never used a flat whisk.  Looks like an interesting tool.  I do have a large Danish whisk and I like it.  I don't use it in bread dough but I use it to whisk pancake or waffle batter.  A nice tool to have.


Al



mrfrost's picture
mrfrost

Just don't see how the flat whisk could possibly compare to the Danish whisk when mixing a stiff dough.


Just can't see the flat whisk surviving the task without being hopelessly bent out of shape.


 

bnom's picture
bnom

I've been using the whisk in the photo for mixing bread for over a year. (The whisk itself is probably 15 years old.)I don't believe I've tried it in super stiff-miche-type doughs but then I don't tend to make those. Here's a pic of my Rosle:


Dave323's picture
Dave323

I also have a flat whisk, which I love for sauces, etc., but it doesn’t seem as rigid as yours. Yours is probably a higher end tool than mine. Mine would not survive a stiff 100% whole wheat dough.


 


Flat whisks, as I understand it, are built the way they are for two reasons; One, to lay flat on the bottom of a pot, so that you can scrape effectively to prevent burning, and: Two, to specifically avoid adding air to the sauce you are whisking.


 


I’ve just now sent away for a Danish dough whisk and look forward to using it the first time. It appears, what with the curlicues and such, that is is intended to add air to a batter or dough.


 


I may also look at a stiffer flat whisk. Gotta love a multi-use tool. :)


 

SylviaH's picture
SylviaH

I use it just for things like mixing hot puddings, frostings, scrambling eggs..I don't think it would be strong enough or was meant to mix bread dough, it is a 'whisk tool' meaning I take for 'lighter work' to incorporate air.  The flat whisk I believe is really great for keeping delicate puddings from burning on the bottom of the pot..it keeps everything moving on the bottom.  Nothings worse than burnt puddings.   I think different from a 'mixer' tool I would use for 'heavier work'..but what doesn't work for me may well work for others.  Even my hand mixer and stand mixer comes with beaters and an attachment..one for whipping, mixing , even a dough hook..all are good and perform different jobs.\please excuse my spelling !  brain works weird on the keyboard : D


Sylvia

mrfrost's picture
mrfrost

Agree 100%.

3 Olives's picture
3 Olives

I love the long handled Danish whisk. Turn it parallel to the sides in square or rectangle tubs and it works well.

Gunnersbury's picture
Gunnersbury

I got the Danish dough whisk about six months ago: after mixing dough for the past twenty years: I wish I had alway had it: looks so odd and one wonders how it could possibly work, but it is wonderful.