The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Which grain mill?

  • Pin It
kolobezka's picture
kolobezka

Which grain mill?

Hi,


I would like to mill my own wholegrain flour at home but do not know which grain mill works best. Is it better to buy a separate mill - a wooden one from Komo or something like Nutrimill. Or is the grain mill attachement to KitchenAid or Bosch mixer or Champion juicer doing the same job?


It would be great if it would grind also some legume flours, would not be too noisy and would not destroy the nutritional value by overheating.


Any advice and recommandation are welcome!


 


zdenka

Haolemon's picture
Haolemon

Whisper Mill has served me well.

BabyBlue's picture
BabyBlue

I have a nutrimill and I love it.  I was going to buy the Kitchenaid attachment for my machine, but the online reviews said to stay clear of it because it will ruin your kitchenaid.  It says you can do about 6 to 8 cups of flour at a time, and then you have to shut it off so that your machine doesn't overheat.  I love my kitchenaid too much to put it through that kind of workout... I would hate to lose it.


 


Blue


 

Futterbudget's picture
Futterbudget

When I was about to buy a mill, I asked all my "Amish" friends which mill they like best, and most of them said the Nutrimill (yea, these Amish have electricity).  So that is what I bought, and I've never regretted it.  It can grind the coarse flour I need for Desem bread, as well as fine flour for yeast bread, and it keeps the flour cool too.


I actually just wrote an article about all the benefits of the Nutrimill for members of our wheat co-op in Tennessee.  Come on over and take a look at my grain mill article here.


Erin
BulkNaturalFoods.com

BettyR's picture
BettyR

I also have a Nutrimill and I too love it. I grind small batches (about 4 cups of berries) and empty the flour into a bag then grind again. This gives the mill time to cool down between batches and your flour will stay cool.

I usually grind about 6 pounds of flour and it goes straight into the freezer to keep it fresh.

You can't get cracked wheat or really course meal with a Nutrimill but a small hand crank mill is fairly cheap if you want cracked wheat or very course meal.

Your Nutrimill will grind popcorn where many other mills won't. Popcorn makes really good cornbread, it has a wonderfully fresh taste compared to store meal.

You must be very careful where you purchase your wheat berries with with this type of mill though. One stone mixed in with the wheat berries will ruin your mill and it is not warrantied against that type of damage.

Honeyvillegains.com carries triple cleaned wheat berries and they ship your entire order for $4.49. They are having a 15% off your entire order right now until April 6th. You just order online as usual and enter the coupon code NOFOOL during checkout. This sale came just in time for me I'm down to the bottom of may last bucket of berries.

Doc Tracy's picture
Doc Tracy

Is open, gets flour all over the kitchen, can only do a few cups at a time before getting too hot and will burn out my motor?? Darn it! I have a gift certificate at a Kitchen store that doesn't sell Nutrimill, they only sell the Kitchen Aid grain mill attachement and I'm wanting a grain mill in the worst way.


I guess I'm going to have to plunk down the cash someday in the near future and buy the Nutrimill. I'll pay for it in about a year of shipping fees with buying my flour out of state anyway. Plus, just found a Mormon store nearby that sells bulk grains for cheap.


If anyone has anything kind to say about the kitchen aid mill, please let me know.

Mary Clare's picture
Mary Clare

Hello!


I've used my Kitchen Aid grain mill for over 20 years.  I did baby both it and my mixer:  I only ground about 2 1/2 cups of grain at a time, and I ran it through twice.  The first time through I just cracked it (about 5-6 counter-clockwise clicks) and then I ran it through again for the finest flour I could get (one click).  The mixer would be warm, and I would let it cool for awhile until I made bread or anything else with it.  It also cracked corn for cornmeal, rice for cereal, etc.  I did this for our family of six for years and years.  The mixer needed repairs occasionally.  It still works, but now my daughter has it and I have a new one : )


I bought a Nutrimill about 3 years ago so I could grind more flour at a time, keeping the Kitchen Aid for coarser grinds.  The Nutrimill has been out for repair twice, and now Kitchen Resources, bless their hearts, are now sending me a new one, free of charge.  It started spitting out chunks of grain.  Also they instructed that wheat should not be ground at the finest setting it offers.  I'll see what that looks like when the new one comes.  But in my old one, that setting gave me coarser flour than my Kitchen Aid! Anyone have a different experience?


Another thing with the Nutrimill.  I noticed the flour absorbed water differently than the flour with the Nutrimill.  Starch damage?  Nutrimill flour would absorb water quickly and then the dough would be slack later. My experience with whole wheat flour was usually the opposite -- you would mix the dough wetter at first, because as it absorbed water it would stiffen up later. 


Happy Baking!


Mary Clare in MO

kolobezka's picture
kolobezka

Thank you Mary Clare for sharing your experience. I find your story very helpful!


zdenka

BabyBlue's picture
BabyBlue

Thanks for sharing Mary Clare!  I too find that my flour absorbs water really quickly and is really slack.  I have been reading a lot of posts here and have wondered how people can quickly adapt their home milled flour to recipes that are for commercial flour!  I have been doing this for several months now and I am still struggling to get the perfect loaf.  My dough is stiff.  Very stiff, and if I let it rise before baking, I get flat bread! 


Please tell me more about the bread you are making.


I am grinding my flour very fine in my nutrimill, and so maybe I should try a coarser setting?  I don't want to use gluten or dough enhancer in my bread, and I don't want to add white flour either. 


 


Blue

Mary Clare's picture
Mary Clare

I bake mostly whole wheat bread, straight dough.  I like to put cooked grains in it, or mashed potato to keep it moist, but if I don't make time for that, I put in a couple of tablespoons of potato flour.  Usually I add about 25% white bread flour, but sometimes I do 100% whole wheat.  I like to add honey, egg and butter.  I have done some lecithin, too, or a tablespoon of soy flour, etc.  I do have some wheat gluten that I use perhaps a half-teaspoon per loaf, if I think the dough will be pretty heavy without it.  I love whole grains, but I want my family to be happy, too!


I noticed that the flour in the Nutrimill behaved differently than what I had milled in my Kitchen Aid.  I just received a brand-new Nutrimill from Kitchen Resources to replace the one I'd had trouble with.  It came with a paper specifically directing not to mill wheat on the finest available setting (more at 11 or 12 o'clock instead of 10 o'clock on the dial).  So I've milled flour on the new setting, and the flour is still pretty finely milled.  I should do some side-by-side tests with the Kitchen Aid-produced flour and the Nutrimill flour... and maybe even commercially milled white wheat (that's the kind of berries I buy) and see how each behaves.


Good luck in your milling and baking!


Mary Clare

kolobezka's picture
kolobezka

When reading other dicussions abou home grain milling I have found that Nutrimill and similar products are "micronizers" as opposed to stone milling...


Could anybody explain what this term means? How it works?


Thanks!


zdenka

charbono's picture
charbono

Micronizer mills are also called impact mills. See Walton Feed for a general discussion of mill types. Pleasant Hill Grain also has good info.

Futterbudget's picture
Futterbudget

are explained quite well on this (short) 2-video series.  


http://www.bulknaturalfoods.com/nutrimill-grain-mill.html

brent21's picture
brent21

Grain Flaker  will be the best choice for you as it fulfills all the requirements needed by you.I'm using it since last seven moths & am very satisfied by its performance,specially it keeps the nutritional value.

BabyBlue's picture
BabyBlue

Which grain flaker are you using?  And what kind does your flour turn out like? 


I am using a nutrimill, like stated above, but I would love to learn about the grain flakers and what the flour texture is like.


Thanks,


Blue

idiotbaker's picture
idiotbaker

use the whisper mill as well.  only for wheat but does a good job.

Futterbudget's picture
Futterbudget

I, too, would like to know which grain flakers folks are using and what works well.


~Futterbudget 

brent21's picture
brent21

Sorry for late response,the grain flaker is from NorPro.It mainly grinds coarse flour without loosing the nutrients.For more information about it,please visit http://www.grainflaker.com .

k welch's picture
k welch

No one has mentioned the WonderMill, but it is super!  It is the latest model after the WhisperMill.  Nutrimill has its issues, the canister gasket is very tight and hard to get the lid off.  It doesn't feed the larger dent corn or kidney bean through the hopper very well either.  The Kitchen Aid mill attachment doen't grind  very fine, plus it could wear out the motor.  I like my Kitchen Aid mixer and don't want the motor to go on me.  I had Magic Mill before my Wondermill, the upgrade to the new mill was a wonderful thing. 


Karan