The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Rye Bread

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rayel's picture
rayel

Rye Bread

Here is my recent Petaluma Rye. Small percentage rye but large rye flavor. This is from Laurel's Breadbook. Comments please.  Ray


rayel's picture
rayel

Bread was baked one at a time under stainless cover on stone. The steam helped a bit with the crust. I added carroway seeds as an afterthought, on the loaf rather than in it. Really nice flavor from the whole rye flour about 17%. The other flour was whole wheat.   Ray


Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

The crust is lovey browned whole wheat richness and then the extra kick of rye!  Lovely crumb to sink one's teeth into!  Is it as soft as it looks?


Mini

Matt H's picture
Matt H

Great color and nice amount of oven spring for a wholemeal loaf.


I didn't know anyone still used Laurel's Kitchen. It's a classic, but I consider somewhat of a historical oddity at this point. :)

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

David

nicodvb's picture
nicodvb

Can you post the details of the recipe, please?

rayel's picture
rayel

Hi Mini, Thanks for compliments. The bread was soft, and chewy at the same time. The crust was absolutely brittle when toasted. Really satisfying bread. Thanks again,  Ray

rayel's picture
rayel

Hi Matt H.  Thanks for nice comments.


The color and spring, really happend with this bake. I am curious, and amused at your characterization of the book. Do you feel that it is outdated? The book and I go way back together, like good friends. You might say we are both historical oddities. (chuckling) at least I for sure. I am in a comfortable rut in my use of this book. I really enjoy the bread from it, and the easy and unambiguous recipes. I have many of the other important books on bread, but keep gravitating to the familiar. Perhaps it is time that I leave my comfort zone, and opt for more challenging fare. Thanks again for your response, Ray


 


 

Matt H's picture
Matt H

Oh, don't get me wrong. I cherish the copy that I own. But I'm an engineer in my 30s, and when I read it, it seems quaintly dated and a little hippy-dippy.


For example, I recall the authors writing that you must knead for a minimum of 10 minutes, usually more. I've adopted the more contemporary ideas about high hydration doughs using small amounts of yeast, and I've made some incredible loaves with no kneading, or with just a few stretch-and-folds. I don't think these ideas were in common currency among home cooks and cookbook writers two decades ago.


I remember being baffled by their long description of the bread they call Desem. I couldn't understand how it was different from a stiff, low-hydration whole-grain sourdough, couched in some mystical mumbo-jumbo.


I also recall some rather dubious claims about nutrition and some procedures that I wouldn't consider too sanitary when it comes to handling doughs.

rayel's picture
rayel

Hi David, thanks for noticing, and the fine compliment.  Ray

jennyloh's picture
jennyloh

Beautiful loaves!  At least classic recipe works well....it looks delicious!

rayel's picture
rayel

Hi jennyloh. Thanks for your nice compliment, and supportive view. Ray

rayel's picture
rayel

Hi nicodvb. Thank you. I haven't forgotten your request, just trying to think of a way to share this recipe, short of printing the whole thing. I am concerened that I would leave out some important detail .  If your are from the states, the library is an easy way to see the book. There are zillions of copies out there. You might enjoy trying some of the other recipes as well. Ray

00Eve00's picture
00Eve00

Those are lovely.  The spring, crust, crumb....they are beautiful.


They look delicious also. ;)