The Fresh Loaf

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Non wheat, non corn bread?

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Chrissie's picture
Chrissie

Non wheat, non corn bread?

Hi


 


I have recetly been diagnosed with Crohn's disease and, through an elimination diet, have discovered that I am intolerant to wheat, dairy and corn amongst others. I would really like to try and find a recipe for a bread which contains neither wheat nor corn (maize) but  this is proving very difficult!


Does anyone know of such a recipe or can anyone suggest any possibilities. I also have to be careful with binders such as Xanthan gum as research tells me this can be derived from corn!! Any help would be very welcome.


 


Chrissie

Doc Tracy's picture
Doc Tracy

Can you have rye? How about Mini's Favorite 100% rye bread? I did a major elimination diet about 4 years ago because I had 32 sensitivities, including dairy, pepper, most spices, yeast. It was really hard but with the help of some nutritional guidelines from the place that did the testing I was able to prepare many tasty meals and snacks.


I'm sure you'll be able to come up with lots of good stuff for that is suitable for Crohn's and dairy intolerance.


I use soy milk for all my milk substitutions. I've never made anything that calls  for milk that didn't turn out wonderful with soy milk. (except that you can't use it in instant pudding for some reason)


There are lots of substitutes for wheat and corn (such as rye and buckwheat). I'm sure you'll get lots of info here. The big thing with dietary needs is to stop buying prepackaged foods and start cooking/baking for yourself. In the long run, your body will thank you and you'll find that food tastes so much better. Plus, you'll find a new hobby! It's not that much harder to make things from scratch, it just takes a little bit more planning and getting used to.

Chrissie's picture
Chrissie

Hi!


Thanks for your reply. I'm not sure whether or not I can eat rye as I still have it to re-test. I did test it about 4 weeks ago but the results were inconclusive which is why I have to re-test it at the end of my programme. When I have re-tested rye and oats the programme will be complete and I'll know exactly what I can and can't eat!

I've used rice, tapioca, soya, amaranth and  gram flours with success, but have yet to find a bread recipe which doesn't contain either wheat or corn. Most that are wheat free have corn as a substitute which is a no-no for me.


Chrissie

Realdelish's picture
Realdelish

we are corn free and I make gluten free breads with a mixture of sorghum, brown rice and tapioca flour and I use guar gum for a binder.   I really found I had to experiment with gluten free baking to get to know what i was doing with bread - quick breads are an easy place to start, they are easier GF.   I now eat wheat bread again (yay!) as I learned enriched flour contains corn, but, unenriched does not. 


Also, if you need a hand avoiding corn in all it's various forms do take a look at this forum, it is most helpful.  http://forums.delphiforums.com/AvoidingCorn/start

Doc Tracy's picture
Doc Tracy

See Mini's rye recipe. It is 100% rye. If you test ok on rye that would be the one I'd go for. Also, are you testing spelt? It's a close relative of wheat but many people that can't eat wheat are ok with spelt?

clazar123's picture
clazar123

You may have a different diagnosis but your food intolerances may be similar to those with celiac disease(gluten intolerance), just with some additions.


 Take a look for ingredients,bread mixes and recipes on celiac/gluten intolerant support websites as these may work for you.


I did a post on this forum about how the different grains are related to wheat that may be helpful, also.Try this:


http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/14754/wheat-free


People with multiple allergies often don't tolerate close relatives of that grain for long and end up developing another food to which they are intolerant so I  would be very cautious about using spelt.


Take a look for the Food Allergy Network.They have excellent resources for people with all kinds of food allergies,hold seminars,have manufacturer's information and often have local chapters. They were very helpful when I needed them.


http://www.foodallergy.org/


This is the link for the parent organization and it may be helpful for you.To find a local support group, click on "Education" and then "SUpport Groups" on the drop down menu. It took me a few minutes to find it. There is a LOT of info on this site.