The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

No Knead Sourdough Help!

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buddyenright's picture
buddyenright

No Knead Sourdough Help!

I've been successfully making NK bread for 6 months.  Lots of types and flavors. Have it down to pat. It's really, really good. Friends say "you should open a bakery..." Hah!



I've made SD starter using the Gelzer method. It's stiff, smells great. I feed it, keep it fresh and I think strong.



I've had terrible luck using it to make NK bread. The dough after a (no matter) 9, 12 or 15 hour intial rise the dough looks good in the Cambro container, lots of bubbles, a good/normal rise, lots of volume.  It scrapes out pretty well (doesn't pour in some runny fashion).


But when it's time to stretch it out or ready for my normal French fold, it's like a pile of glop.  There's no real structure.  While folding it often "falls apart." If I'm lucky I can form a ball of sorts and get it to rise again for a shot at the oven. More often than not though the finished loaf has no spring and ends up an ovoid, dense saucer (though pretty sour!).



I've found that a pinch of yeast added to the initial mix/stir helps make a pretty fool proof loaf. Good rise, great chewy crust.



My problem- how to avoid the commercial yeast and make it with SD starter only.



Any ideas?


 


Thanks!

Ford's picture
Ford

You say "The dough after a (no matter) 9, 12 or 15 hour intial rise the dough looks good in the Cambro container, lots of bubbles, a good/normal rise, lots of volume."  To me that sounds like a very long time to have the dough at room temperature.  This dough is acidic (low pH). Under these conditions the gluten might be destroyed and is now unable to hold the gas.  You do not need a long period to develop the flavor as you would with commercial yeast.  The starter does that for you.


Ford

mdnance's picture
mdnance

I have had the exact same problem with my no knead sourdough.  It has been really frustrating.   So much so that I actually kneaded it for 10 minutes last night, let it rise for four hours and then put it in the oven and it rose perfectly.  


 

jeb's picture
jeb

I had the same problem when I tried it, and haven't gotten around to trying it again. But, at the time, I was using a 100% hydration starter that would end up like pancake batter after a long fermentation. I recently saw an article somewhere that suggested using bread flour, rather than AP flour to feed the starter, as it is more resistant to some of the enzymes released by the organisms in the starter culture.


I have also switched to a 50% hydration starter, and haven't had a problem with it seeming to liquify (That may be related to the maturity of my starter. It was only about 3 weeks old when I was trying to use it with no knead bread.)