The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

New Member Introduction and recipe question

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seb141's picture
seb141

New Member Introduction and recipe question

Greetings,


I'm seb141, but you can call me Barbara.  I read about The Fresh Loaf in my recent Saveur Magazine and had to sign up right away.  I am entering into my 6th month of baking all the bread we eat at home. 


This is not the first time I've tried to do this, but it is the first time I've tried to do it without a bread machine; it IS the first time no one has said, "Mom can you please start buying bread again?"  They are excited, sometimes eating the majority of a loaf before it hits the bread basket, and I am falling in love with my newest cooking venture.


Because of the convenience and large quantity I've enjoyed the " ...in 5 minutes a day" series, however I'm always looking for a new favorite.


I do look forward to developing my skills and gaining more time to experiment. 


Does anyone have a consistently successful pumpernickel rye recipe for us beginners?


Barbara

basslakebaker's picture
basslakebaker

There's a nice pumpernickel in Reinhart's Brother Juniper's Bread book.  I switched it up a bit, but it came out great.  You can probably get the book at your local library.

seb141's picture
seb141

I will check it out from the library, Thanks!

ehanner's picture
ehanner

Welcome to the site Barbara.


You asked about Pumpernickel. In the US people generally think about Pumpernickel as a dark rye. The word has taken on several meanings depending on who you ask. I have been making a 100% rye loaf that is slow baked and very dense and flavorful which is called a Pumpernickel also. I would say it's not a bread for starting to learn about rye however.


For learning about rye I suggest you start with something with around 30% rye and 70% bread flour and go from there. The wheat flour contributes the gluten to the mix so the dough feels similar to what you are used to. The rye component and usually with caraway seeds will taste great and make a nice transition to rye breads. Here is a link to my favorite rye.


Scroll down for the recipe.


I look forward to seeing you work in the future.


Eric

seb141's picture
seb141

Thanks Eric,


At first glance I think this rye might be lighter than what I'm after, but it looks really good!


I'm wanting the darker rye with molasses or coffee...I've heard many versions, made one that was just OK.


I am hoping to find one with at least 50% bread flour for the convenience.


 


Thanks,


Barbara

ehanner's picture
ehanner

You can always add components to the base recipe that won't change the handling much to suit your taste. Andy (ananda) has gotten me to use Black Strap molasses at about 8% of flour weight. It darkens the dough and gives it a nice rich flavor. You can also use whole rye which is the dark rye or sometimes called pumpernickel rye.


Eric

Oldcampcook's picture
Oldcampcook

I have baked this recipe for quite a while now.  At least weekly because it is my favorite bread.  I sometimes use molasses, but usually just pour in until I like the color.  I will try the 8 percent.


I cannot get first clear here, so I suffer with either all purpose or bread flours.


And i use whole rye flour in my starter.


Bob

seb141's picture
seb141

I purchased some dark rye flour this weekend, and I have molasses and barley malt powder, which I thought I'd try instead of carmel color.  Thanks for the recipe.  I was busy and ended up making good old whole wheat yesterday.


barbara

seb141's picture
seb141

Thanks.  This looks really good too!  I'm so excited to try these recipes.  Now I have two to play around with this week; I hope I have some extra time!


barbara