The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Differences between Stone Baking and Oven Baking

KevinC's picture
KevinC

Differences between Stone Baking and Oven Baking

Need to some help to define the differences between these two.


Can anyone tell me the advantages of one against the other and their disadvantages

LindyD's picture
LindyD

I take it you wish to know the difference between baking on a baking stone versus a metal sheet pan.


A preheated baking stone retains and generates more heat than a sheet pan.  The stone is thicker than the metal pan and that thickness allows the heat to be constantly released during the bake, allowing for a longer period of oven spring.


Metal is conductive and its heat quickly dissipates into the surface of the dough, resulting in a shorter time for oven spring.


My oven isn't big enough to conduct an experiment using a stone and a metal sheet, each holding dough mixed and shaped from the same batch, so I don't know what the degree of difference in oven spring is.  It would be an interesting experiment.

Elagins's picture
Elagins

stones generally have far greater mass than a metal sheet pan and, since they need to absorb more heat to get to temperature, they act much more as a thermal sink, stabilizing oven temps to a far greater degree than a metal baking sheet -- something that matters a great deal for home ovens, which lose heat at a frightening rate as soon as the door is opened.


For example, I find that my GE electric loses about 30F when I load and another 20F if and when I apply steam. Baking sheets, which most often are made of aluminum -- which also loses heat quickly -- simply can't provide the extra layer of thermal stability that a stone can.


Stan Ginsberg
www.nybakers.com

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

surfaces and I don't use a stone.  Don't want to either.  Many bakers do not use stones but the stones seem to grab all the attention.  Seems to me, I would have to use higher temperatures and more energy preheating if using a stone.  If metal is heated to the same temps, the bread burns.  A convection oven supplies metal pans and sheets with a stable temperature being transferred to the dough.   There is a reason metal pans exist.  Had they not worked, they would have gone into disuse ages ago.


Mini


 

KevinC's picture
KevinC

thanks for responding, those information surely are helpful


what about the taste if i was to make bread using both these methods? which would you say would taste better and what do people in general prefers?

Elagins's picture
Elagins

because of the amount of heat it absorbs, stone will give you a thicker bottom crust than either steel or aluminum, with a corresponding increase in the degree of caramelization ... you might get a chewier, slightly sweeter bread from stone, but most of the flavor differences will depend on your dough formula and how you handle it.


Stan Ginsberg
www.nybakers.com