The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

High Protein Flour

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rts306's picture
rts306

High Protein Flour

Our local costco sells high protein flour in 25 lb bags for less than $9....I am wondering if I can substitute this for bread flour (maybe exchanging one Tbsp of this with cornstarch to lower the protein).....KA bread flour is not easy to get here and is also more than twice as costly. 


 


ALSO....Does anyone know if high protein can be used to make chewy noodles (people use bread flour) - not pasta ?


TIA!

mrfrost's picture
mrfrost

You can blend the high protein flour with ap flour or any lower protein flour to achieve a flour of your desired protein level anywhere between the two flours used.


Use this mixed mass(on right, after link) calculator to blend a flour of your desired protein level:


http://tools.foodsim.com/


 


 

flournwater's picture
flournwater

"high protein flour" can be a  misleading label.  One manufacturer's high protein flour isn't always the same as another's.  Before you make a decision on adjusting the protein level in the flour for your bread formula, check the nutritional information on the label to determine the actual percentage of protein and work from that foundation.  It's difficult (if not impossible) to accurately assess the results of a formula when you don't' know specifically what went into it.

rts306's picture
rts306

Thanks for the conversion site...I believe the flour bags listed 4 gm of protein per 30 gm...so that means 13.3 gm protein per 100 gm flour...correct?


Does it mean that if the protein content is correct....one can substitute one type of wheat flour (among AP, bread, cake flours except for whole wheat) for another without much change in the products baked?  OR do other factors come into play?


 

mrfrost's picture
mrfrost

Unfortunately, the nutrition label can only offer a rough guide of the true protein % in flour. This is because of rounding.


4 gm of protein could really be 3.5 gm, 4.4 gm, or anything in between. Only a food lab, or the manufacturer can know the precise %.


That 4 gm protein is probably the figure printed on the label of most bread fours, probably KAAP, and maybe even some "high protein" flours.


I use White Lily "Bread Flour", which lists the same 4 gm, which also calculates to the 13.3% level. I'm pretty certain, it isn't that strong. This somewhat older(2006) flour test by the Artisan claims to  have obtained the precise level direct from White Lily, of 11.7 %. It also lists the levels of some other flours, if the manufacturers were willing to give the precise level. Some, evidently, were not so forthright in divulging the info. At the same time, maybe some are not claiming to be as consistent as, say KA, in maintaing a strict %. Flour Test:


http://www.theartisan.net/flour_test.htm


The dropdown menus in the calculator linked in my post above shows the level(%) that many of the popular flours are thought to have. Although I imagine some of the numbers would be confirmed by the manufacturers(KA), and some maybe just calculated like you have.


ps: Also as for whole grain flours, the protein level is not as relevant in terms of proteins that will actually contributing to the glutn structure, because some of the protein is in the bran(which interferes with gluten), and other reasons.

rts306's picture
rts306

I think I will just drive further and get my usual KA unbleached bread flour in 5 lb bags.