The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Advice

bendiab's picture
bendiab

Advice

Hello everyone


I wonder if someone can help out with some advice, I make a standard loaf (in a tin) on a fairly regular basis and have come across an annoyance which I am hoping someone can shed some light on why it is happening.


Once the dough has risen and been knocked back I shape the dough by rolling it up in as tight a roll as possible, then tuck the ends in and place in the tin for the final rising. After an hour or so the bread has risen beautifully, and also comes out the oven looking very good. The annoyance is that there is a crescent/swirl shaped gap in the running throughout the loaf (if that makes sense!), no doubt caused by my method of rolling the dough up to shape the loaf.


Am I doing something wrong? It is very frustrating!


Any advice is appreciated!


Ben


 

bakinbuff's picture
bakinbuff

Hi Ben!  This is an air pocket inside the roll of dough.  When you begin to roll up the dough (which is a good way to get a nice sandwich loaf, I always do it that way), make sure you tuck the first roll (the edge that you are starting from) really tightly and firmly against the dough you are rolling it onto, otherwise you end up with a pocket of air which will result in a hole in the middle of the bread (not ideal if you don't want your sandwich filling/butter and jam falling through!).  The best thing to do is when you've rolled the first piece of dough, smooth it over from the middle out towards the sides to encourage any large pocket of air out.  Hope this is helpful!

Yerffej's picture
Yerffej

Ben,


What is the hydration level of the dough? On what surface are you rolling the dough?  Is it a floured surface?  Posting the entire recipe would also be a big help in answering your question.


Jeff

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

if you can.  Bakinbuff  (naked baker?) has some good tips.  It also helps to use as little flour as possible for this can keep the rolled up layers from sticking to themselves as the dough is rolled.   Oil, same problem.