The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Hello from MI

  • Pin It
EdY MI's picture
EdY MI

Hello from MI

Hello from Huntington Woods, MI. I have been following this site for several months and am impressed by the great community of bread bakers. TFL is a great source for knowledge and inspiration. I have been baking bread machine sandwich breads on and off for many years but my bread baking irrevocably changed when I received Xmas gifts of PR's Bread Baker's Apprentice and RLB's The Bread Bible. Learning to bake artisan loaves became my new passion. 


I have heard that pictures are welcomed, so a tale of getting back in saddle, so to speak. When Jim Lahey's recipe for no-knead bread came out a few years back I gave it a try. Not have worked with such a high hydration dough, the result was pretty much a disaster. Dough was stuck to the towel and my hands and not much ended up in the Lodge Dutch oven (but the bread that came out was delicious). I received a copy of Jim Lahey's "My Bread" over last year's holidays. Thanks to detailed instructions and helpful photos plus more experience in the interim I was able to bake some actually decent no-knead loaves. For his basic No-Knead bread, I followed his recipe pretty much as outlined in the book using a Lodge cast iron Dutch oven for baking. Photos follow.



For Pan co' Santo (Walnut Bread), final proofing was in a parchment lined 8" skillet as outlined in Cook's Illustrated Almost No-Knead bread so that the loaf could be scored prior to baking. Photos follow.



 


Ed


 


 


 

fairnymph's picture
fairnymph

That first one is amazing! They both are, but wow, that one especially. It looks PERFECT and has me drooling.

EdY MI's picture
EdY MI

Thanks for the compliment. The top loaf was indeed worth the mess that I had to clean up afterwards. The tea towel and loaf were, to say the least, generously dusted with wheat bran some of which ended up on the counter, floor and in the oven when the proofed dough was inverted into the preheated Dutch oven.


Ed

fairnymph's picture
fairnymph

Oh, I love bran! Did you do anything to the dough to get it to stick so well and heavily, or no?

EdY MI's picture
EdY MI

Actually it was my first use of wheat bran to dust a tea towel or loaf. No special treatment was used, the dough was just inherently sticky. The bran did add an extra dimension to the taste and texture of the crust which was quite nice.


Ed

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

beautiful crusts and crumbs there!  Thanks for sharing your photos!  :)  

LindyD's picture
LindyD

And welcome, Ed - from a fellow Michiganian.  I'm way up here in the north woods, where we certainly have more snow than they did in Vancouver! 

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

Hi, Ed.


Welcome to TFL!


Beautiful breads. Stellar crumb on the no-knead one.


And Lindy, in my day, the term for residents of the Wolverine State was "Michiganders." 


David

EdY MI's picture
EdY MI

Yes, more snow this time, but they have the Pacific ocean and those beautiful mountains in their backyard. I do love Michigan, especially up north, but I did feel some pangs of envy.


Ed

LindyD's picture
LindyD

The "gander" part sounds too much like a goose, David, so I opt not to use it.  Actually, we have a choice (per Wikipedia):



Michigander is a demonym for residents of the U.S. state of Michigan. It coexists principally with Michiganian. Less common alternatives include Michiganer, Michiganite, Michiganese, and Michigine. Various Michigan residents may prefer one or the other. (Residents in the Upper Peninsula more typically refer to themselves as Yoopers instead.) The term was once considered pejorative, but has since lost its negative connotation. The web sites of the State of Michigan Department of Natural Resources, the Michigan Humanities Council and the Michigan Historical Center use Michiganian, though there is no officially correct term.


EdY MI's picture
EdY MI

Thanks to all for the nice comments. TFL has brought together a great community of bread bakers and enthusiasts.


Ed