The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Clay pots

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Mieke's picture
Mieke

Clay pots

Hi, I've been baking my own bread for about 6 years now and have had very good luck with it.  I have noticed however in reading this site that many are using Romertopfs and I have a question.  I have a clay baker that is glazed on the outside.  First, can I use this to bake my bread?  Second, do I need to soak this first? 


Can you please tell me how to use this?


 


Mieke

tikobird's picture
tikobird

I'm sorry that I can't help you.I don't even know what romertopfs are. I bake strictly with non-stick bread pans, and no pans for authentic rye and other artisan breads. I've never had a claybaker either. I began baking bread as a teenager and still use bread pans and pan-less bread


Please write back and tell me what Romertopfs are.   Thank you


 


Sorry I could not help.


 


 

Mieke's picture
Mieke

A Romertopf is a clay rectangular baker that you can bake chicken, etc. in.  It is in the shape of a rectangular bread baking pan.  The inside is clay and the outside, on mine, in any regard, is glazed (coated.


I hope this helps.


Maria

tikobird's picture
tikobird

Thanks for the help, Maria. If you have a good recipe for Jewish Rye Bread with caraway seeds, or any rye bread you can recommend would you please send me a recipe. I'd appreciate it so much.


 


Mona

cgmeyer2's picture
cgmeyer2

hi my romertopt is unglazed. i need to soak for 10-15 minutes b4 placing bread in it.  i think mine is ~ 2 - 3 ltr & oblong. i can bake a 1.5 - 2 lb recipe in it.


the instructions sre to soak & then allow to drain on a cloth for ~ 10 min. place bread dough in baker. place baker in a cold oven & set temp to 450 - 475 F. after the temp is reached, the bread is cooked for ~ 40-45 minutes.


hope this helps you.


btw, i would love to have your recipe for jewish rye if you would like to share.


claudia


 

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

Oil lightly after soaking and before putting the dough inside. Or use parchment.

Potter Baker's picture
Potter Baker

I am reading with interest the topic about the clay baking pans since I am a potter.  Making a  bread pan is on my list of things to do next month.  I do not want to glaze the inside but I was worried about the bread sticking. Just for the fun of it I'll  make some bread stamps too.  I'm not an experienced bread maker; just a wannabe breadbaker!


I plan to also make it deeper than usual after reading the post about the extension!


I'll post some photos when my little experimental project is complete! 

jennyloh's picture
jennyloh

Potter Baker - First of all Welcome.  I'm new too to this community.  I love your idea about creating some clay baking pans - Looking forward to seeing them.

JamieK's picture
JamieK

Welcome Potter Baker!  I would think it better for the inside and outside to NOT be glazed.  I love looking for pottery at Art Shows/Fairs.  A Bread baker would be wonderful to have! 


I am very interested in knowing about your bread stamps! Have been wanting to have one for a long time!  JamieK

Janknitz's picture
Janknitz

I think you will be thrilled with your clay baker, the results are stunning.


The big trick is getting the raw dough into the screaming hot bottom, but you don't really have to.  Heat the lid, but proof your dough in the unheated bottom.  When time comes to bake, carefully place the lid onto the baker and bake.  Keep the dough covered about 1/2 of the total baking time.  


Let us know how it works for you.

jennyloh's picture
jennyloh

Janknitz - I'm just wondering why suggest to heat the lid first?  is it like a baking stone,  where the heat is retained to get a crustier bread?


I used claypot,  to bake the bread,  pot and cover goes in together,  1/2 time,  I uncovered the pot.


See Pain de Champagne  baked in a korean claypot (base) - that is usually used to cook ginseng chicken broth in it,  with a chinese claypot cover - didn't have a cover for this korean pot,  but had a chinese claypot..  No soaking,  just oil the internal before the dough goes in.


The crust didn't last too long though. perhaps will try heating up the cover first, and see if that makes any difference to the crust as you suggested.


 


Reid Heilig's picture
Reid Heilig

Romertopf is German and translates as Roman pot.

yaya_786.92's picture
yaya_786.92

I found a clay sort of rounded rectangular top pan with lid in a shed behind my Mother's house.  It has mold on the sides and inside.  I tried to clean it off but it didn't all come off.  Any suggestions as to how to clean it and or can it be used to bake bread?

Leolady's picture
Leolady

Vinegar is a great food safe cleanser and so is baking soda.  I am sure a good soaking and scrubbing with either or both of them will clean your pot.

yaya_786.92's picture
yaya_786.92

Thanks for your input.  I used some baking powder, but didn't think about vinegar.  Both safe cleaners as you point out.  I was just wondering if anyone knew of any problem with cooking in a clay vessel such as this with mold.  Your response didn't sound the alarm bells so I may just clean it as much as possible and forge ahead.  The high heat of baking bread should kill any live spores, if any, anyway.

cgmeyer2's picture
cgmeyer2

if the pot was covered in mold & you don't know what type of mold, i would use a food safe bleach solution. you can add  1 tbsp. of bleach to a gallon of water and immerse the pot & lid in the solution for 15 - 20 min. let the pot & lid dry completely & then soak in hot water for 30 min.; again let the pot & lid dry completely. your pot should be safe to use after this.


claudia

Leolady's picture
Leolady

retain the odor of whatever you clean it with.  I thought that you would probably be a little happier dealing with the residual scent of vinegar, over that of bleach.  Especially since I don't know if there will be any leaching of a little bleach into the food.