The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

overnight raise

gloriakal's picture
gloriakal

overnight raise

I would like to serve sandwiches in my coffee shop made from my own Whole Wheat bread. 

Any ideas on a really good recipe.  I already have several,  but will welcome any new ideas.

 Also, i would like to make the dough in the afternoon, allowing for the 1st rise, and then put it in the fridge overnight, so it is ready to bake in the morning.  I close my shop at 6:00 p.m. and open at 6:30 a.m.

How about making the dough, go for the 1st rise, freeze it, and then take it out at 6:00 p.m. for an overnight rise? I could do several ahead of time this way.

Any suggestions?

Floydm's picture
Floydm

Also, i would like to make the dough in the afternoon, allowing for the 1st rise, and then put it in the fridge overnight, so it is ready to bake in the morning.

That is what the cafe I worked in did. It would be interesting to experiment with other options, but I think that is the safest bet.

gloriakal's picture
gloriakal

Thanks for the input.

I mixed my dough around 3 pm. Had it in the fridge by 5.

When I arrived the next morning @ 6 am, it was perfect.

I just ordered a pullman pan and will be experimenting with that, so my slices are uniform.

sphealey's picture
sphealey

> How about making the dough, go for the 1st rise, freeze it,

> and then take it out at 6:00 p.m. for an overnight rise? I

> could do several ahead of time this way.

 

I believe that is what most artisan bakeries do. They use retarders to lower the temperature for the 2nd rising overnight. They do not freeze the dough.

 

Your timing might be different as you probably want to bake the bread around 8-9 AM, rather than the 4 AM which is typical for a bakery. You could experiment with timing on the retarder to get the dough in during the evening, cool it way down overnight, then allow the temperature to come back up around 5 AM or so. You would want an external datalogging thermometer (Omega Engineering or equivalent) to get good dough temperature readings during the experimentation phase.

 

sPh

Breadwhiner's picture
Breadwhiner

This is the bread I make almost every other day.  It can rise 12-18 h, so if the dough is made sometime in the afternoon, it will be ready to shape in the morning.

50% all purpose flour

50% whole wheat

2% salt

0.2% instant yeast

75% hydration

After all of the dry ingredients are mixed, it just needs a short mix with the water (just enough to incorporate).  The bulk fermentation, 12-18 h, is at room temperature.  For a more open crumb, I use 80% hydration, but I don't know if that is practical in your case.

 Good luck.