The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Sourdough Lamb and Rosemary "Cigars"

louie brown's picture
louie brown

Sourdough Lamb and Rosemary "Cigars"

Another original idea. Lamb/wine braising liquid and ground rosemary mixed to about 75% hydration with KA AP flour. Stretched and folded in the bowl twice over three hours, left on the counter overnight at about 70 degrees. Further bulk fermentation of four or five hours due to the interference of a dentist's appointment. Back out on the counter for an hour, then gently plopped out of the bowl, stretched and treated like grissini, only fatter. Some were shaped with care. A crumb shot of one of these is shown.


This concludes the experiments with flavored liquids for the moment, as I have run out of stuff that needs to get out of the freezer. There is really no limit to what one could come up with. As far as I know, there is not much, if any, of this kind of thing going on beyond the pain marin at Ledoyen in Paris. High end restaurants could have a field day with this approach, and home bakers can dress up their dinner parties with something novel. Crackers and flatbreads are other obvious ways to go.


As always, comment and criticism invited.





 


submitted to yeastspotting







Comments

fairnymph's picture
fairnymph

How strongly did the lamb flavour come through?


It sounds absolutely delicious to me, but in my experience trying to flavour yeasted and quick breads and pasta with liquids...it doesn't really add much flavour, only a hint.

louie brown's picture
louie brown

As with the tomato water bread above, the flavors are mellow and clear. They are not pronounced or strong, which I would not want, but they are unmistakable. Maybe it has something to do with the sourdough and/or the long fermentation. The flavors improved noticeably after a day and stayed that way. I expect that the quality of the flavoring and the degree to which the liquid flavors the bread is affected by the intensity and quality of the ingredient in the first instance.

louie brown's picture
louie brown

Here is a macro photo of the cell structure of one of the cigars, showing pretty clearly the translucence of the crumb:


fairnymph's picture
fairnymph

That's beautiful!


And yes, I understand your basic point about concentration - I was just curious how concentrated in flavour your stock was. :)

louie brown's picture
louie brown

The stock was quite concentrated. It had been reduced a fair amount. When I went to use it, it plopped out of the container in a single gelatinous blob. 

IanM's picture
IanM

Did the alcohol in the marinade affect the fermentation? I find what you are doing here really interesting.

louie brown's picture
louie brown

I don't think so, Ian. The dough behaved as it always does. Of course, the alcohol in the wine would have been long gone from the braising liquid (not a marinade at that point, having been cooked for hours with the lamb and vegetables) anyway. 


When I was fermenting the dough, the aroma of lamb stew was amazing when I took the plastic off the bowl.


I have some fresh duck stock now. I wonder what I might do with that?

mike owens's picture
mike owens

is what i love most about this site.  this got me thinking,  here is a recipe i love for butternut squash enchiladas ( http://www.vegetariantimes.com/recipes/10898?section= ).  i am a little afraid to just jump into it so does anyone think (after looking at the recipe) that the filling  would be good incorporated into a loaf.  what would the cream cheese do to the bread, if any thing.  thanks, mike

spsq's picture
spsq

If it were me (and it might be soon, looks delicious), I would not kneed the ingredients into the dough, but would make a dough, make the filling, then roll out the dough, spread the filling onto it, and roll it up "jellyroll" style.  mmmmmmmmm!


 

louie brown's picture
louie brown

This brings to mind Indian or Middle Eastern cooking. Certainly, the ingredients would be delicious with a flatbread in either of those cuisines.

ehanner's picture
ehanner

This is good work Louie. Your Cigars look great and sound delicious. What a novel idea you are working with. You have my wheels turning, thanks!


Eric

louie brown's picture
louie brown

Thank you so much. Right now, in between attempts at a 100% whole wheat sourdough baguette, I am getting ready to try to recreate the old world style Italian "meat bread," from which the Italo-American "prosciutto bread" is derived. I've been advised that fresh bacon would provide the best lard and cracklings when rendered. I'm still not sure what to do with the duck stock, which has a much less assertive flavor than the lamb broth. Unfortunately, the cracklings from the duck skin had an off flavor, or they would have gone into rolls.

zoltan szabo's picture
zoltan szabo

Hello Louie,


very inspiring, i will defenetly try out! Even if not with lamb but with other roasting/braising juices.


Happy Baking,


Zoltan