The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Bread machines

a.s.prior's picture
a.s.prior

Bread machines

Hello im a new user just started making bread. Im a student and as part of our project we have been asked by a company called kenwood to improve and re-design a bread machine i was wondering if anyone had ever had any problems with a bread machine or has any tips or anything to do with them tbh would help. Any problems you could share would be a huge help thank you.

BettyR's picture
BettyR

I am a loyal user of a bread machine and have been for years. I will admit that the only thing I use my bread machine for is kneading my dough. I bake my bread in the oven.

But as a bread machine user I would like to have more control over the timing of my dough cycle. I would like to be able to program in a rest time and the kneading time as well as the fermenting time. I would like to be able to stop the machine in the middle of kneading and restart it without having to start the timer all over again.

I had been wishing for years for a bread machine with two kneading paddles and I finally got that and it was a huge improvement.

a.s.prior's picture
a.s.prior

Thanks thats interesting can i ask if the machine was just for kneading would you still buy it ? ive heard of a couple of people who just use the machine to make the dough is there any reason for this?

thanks for your post

BettyR's picture
BettyR

If the machine had been made just for kneading I would expect to have much more control of the timing of different functions of the machine and yes I would still buy it.

 

Yes, there is a reason that I don't use the machine to bake my bread...

1) I make more than one loaf of bread at a time. I make all the bread we eat and I would be baking bread every day if I had to make it one loaf at a time.

2) The machine has to heat up with the bread inside, this will cause the quality of the bread to suffer.

3) Different recipes use different heat settings and different baking times. I can't set a bread machine for the differences in the recipes.

4) Even when I'm using the same recipe sometimes the baking time will be different for whatever reason and so I always set my timer for the minimum time and check the loafs with a thermometer to judge if the bread is done or if it needs to cook longer.

5) I often make other things like rolls, babka, kolaches, hamburger buns, hot dog buns, and so on...these things you couldn't bake in a bread machine.

Janknitz's picture
Janknitz

Many of us say we use our machines only for kneading, but what we really mean is that we use it for kneading AND proofing. 

So, yes, I might buy just a kneading and proofing machine with no expectation of baking in it for all the reasons Betty states (but WATCH the price point--if it approaches the cost of a Kitchen Aid Mixer, then why bother? It would have to be well under $100.)

As far as ideal features for a kneading and proofing machine, I would like full and total control over at least one user programmable cycle.  I would like to be able to control exactly what steps there are (warming, kneading, holding, etc) the  order and timing of every step, and the temperature of every step.  The ability to save this user programmed cycle and use it again is great, the ability to save and store several user programmable cycles would be even better.  As mentioned above, some sort of pause button is really needed. 

A cycle for kneading and proofing sourdough would be great.

If this dream machine was so programmable that you could use it as a home made yogurt maker (to both heat the milk (180 degrees) and incubate the yogurt (110 degrees) I'd run right out and buy it this minute!  Multitasking is good!

And, of course, being able to set the timer to start the dough cycles 2 to 24 hours in advance (most machines do that already) is required. 

BettyR's picture
BettyR

That is a great idea for the yogurt. I have a yogurt maker and all it does is incubate. We love homemade yogurt.

a.s.prior's picture
a.s.prior

thanks janknitz thats given me a few things to ponder especially like the yoghurt idea could be interesting

maurdel's picture
maurdel

that is a good idea - yoghurt, would be nice  but I wouldn't buy it for that because I make it in a pot on the stove.

I would like one that would have a more controllable bake setting so that pound cakes and banana breads & such would bake better.

My Zojirushi comes w/ instructions for jam making- When I think about that and the yoghurt, I would definitely prefer a different material for the pan, not a non-stick coating.

thebreadfairy's picture
thebreadfairy

Deleted

Aussie Pete's picture
Aussie Pete

I can only reinforce the comments of Betty R and Jan. Correctly put

The other negative  as to why I don't use mine to bake and just to use the "dough Only" button is the damage the paddle will do to your loaf when removed when finished baking. I don't know about others but even though it cooked a nice loaf I always had the bottom crust left with a nasty tear in it. I could I have been handling it incorrectly or has this been the experience of others as well? But to have a sensible priced  "kneading and proofing machine only" would be on my agenda if it was available. If I had the time I would knead but I don't. My mother in law uses a mix master with a dough hook as she does not have the strength to knead properly with her hands. So.......there must be a market out there for the people like us who only require a mix, knead and proofing machine.

So here is a chance to let the electrical companies know what the market is thinking. Any other other comments to help this person out.............Peter

Betty stated it perfectly. Good thinking Betty.................Peter

 

Janknitz's picture
Janknitz

During the summer when it's just too darn hot to turn on the oven I sometimes resort to baking in my machine. 

I learned this trick from somewhere, but cannot remember where.  You have to look up the cycle for the bread you are making in the manual and figure out when all the kneading is done and your machine is just starting to warm up for the bake.   I set a timer so I don't miss it.   Remove the dough from the bucket, take out the paddle, reshape the dough as needed and put it back in the bucket.  Then let the baking continue.  No hole!

It's a bit of a pain because you have to be pretty precise on the timing.  You don't want to let the dough really start baking before you remove the paddle, but you want the paddle there for the final bit of kneading. 

This is where it would be great to have a pause feature for one thing and perhaps a special audible alert to tell you exactly when to remove the paddle. 

tempe's picture
tempe

Hey, thanks Janknitz for this tip about taking the paddle out.  I too only use my bread machine for kneading and proving due to the fact that I hate the hole it leaves in the bottom of the loaf, so much wasted bread.  Admittedly I only use my machine when I want for the convenience of set and forget, but I will definitely give this a go.

kolobezka's picture
kolobezka

I also use a bread machine regularly, sometimes just for kneading, sometimes for frementation a sometimes I do great sandwich breads on the complete cycle. Here in Europe the KA is very expensive, lets say 4-6times the price of a BM. Aldo baking in a BM is much cheaper comparing to an electric oven. Unfortunately my new BM is not kenwood... Here are some criteria I followed when choosing or would appreciate:

- non-teflon coating (at present, German Beem is the only one with ceramic)

- 2 kneading blades and more elongated pan (similar to a standard loaf form)

- double pan (to make to different doughs at the same time - e.g. for 2-colour sweet bakery, 2 small "present" breads)

- individual program. The last model of Kenwood has 5 of them , which is great. But it would be great if one could choose also longer rising times and eventually see or, better, regulate temperature (also for making yoghurts...)

- suggestion for preparing and baking pure sourdough breads - maybe in the test kitchen of a BM producer there would me more place and conditions for experimenting and finding the best programming than at home.

Hope this helps,

zdenka

maurdel's picture
maurdel

zdenka, I had no idea there was a machine with a ceramic pan. I've never heard of Beem.

I would love to read about it, but I'm betting they are not available here in the USA.- YET

Do you know if there is a website for the company? I've searched, and I see it mentioned but don't see the website.

Thanks for the info,

maurdel

kolobezka's picture
kolobezka

Hi,

no, probably they are not available in US.

They official web is www.beem.de , but this machine is not there yet. You can find there contacts and the list of international partners.

But you can see the offer and description of the machine for example on Ebay

I have had it for 3 weeks now and the coating seem quite good. Non-stick and more resistant to scratches by everyday use (with whole wheat and seeds) - I had a teflon BM before and had to claim it because the teflon was flaking off (well it did from all teflon dishes I used to have, even from "good" marks)

I appreciate your interest in BM improvement!

zdenka

maurdel's picture
maurdel

thanks for the links. I don't know why I could not find it when I searched for "beem". 

I don't like my Zojirushi pan, but couldn't find anything better. So I bought a new one. Hope I can get one of the Beems when this one starts to "flake".

I'll be on the lookout for it. Maybe I will ask at the website as you said.

Thanks again

maurdel

thebreadfairy's picture
thebreadfairy

Like many others, I also sometimes use a bread machine to make the dough rather than bake. For me, the ideal would be a machine that was programmable by a computer either through a USB or network connection. It would be a breakthrough to be able to create bread formulas and input knead and mix cycles and times as well as temperature settings and cycles and store them in software. The big Zoji already has most of the parameters available but is very limited by its front panel programming method and limited memory slots.

sphealey's picture
sphealey

Agree with the idea of a USB port (or similar connectivity) for programming bread cycles.  If the Zo had that and a Pause button/cycle it would already be perfect ;-)

sPh

wquinn2's picture
wquinn2

I use a Zo exclusively now.  I used to have a less expensive model that made a vertical loaf which did very well.  We used that bread machine for years, but I made the mistake of washing the inner pan and paddles in the dishwasher.  This made the paddles rust and the teflon erode from the inside of the pan.  I never wash any part of the bread machine in the dishwasher now.  I was everything all by hand.

Wendy, http://www.breadparadise.com