The Fresh Loaf

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Stiacciata Alla Fiorentina - Sweet Carnival Pizza

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SylviaH's picture
SylviaH

Stiacciata Alla Fiorentina - Sweet Carnival Pizza

Recipe from 'Lorenza De Medici's - Tuscany The Beautiful Cookbook'


Like most Italian Cakes, this sweet Florentine pizza is linked to a religious feast: "Carnival".    At one time lard was used instead of butter, which added to the flavor.


 


    After seeing this recipe in my cookbook,  I searched online for more recipes of this Sweet Carnival Pizza.  The only ones I was able to find were  written in Italian.  This was a frustrating and unfamilar dough for me to handle which resulted in me not following the exact procedures discribed in the recipe.  I was sure I had a total disaster on my hands.  After seeing and tasting my final bake...I may...may attempt it again!  It is a delicate delicious buttery flavored cake, lightly sweet with a lovely hint of lemon and would go perfectly with a glass of wine or a cappuccino or just a big glass of milk.


If anyone is feeling venturesome and care to give this recipe a try I have written it down with just a couple of modifications.


 


 


 


                     


 


                                                                         


 


                     6 fl oz - 3/4 cup - 180 ml        Lukewarm water (105F to 115F)                    


                                              1 oz (30g) fresh cake yeast or 2 packages (1 scant tablespoon each) active dry yeast-  I used the


                                              Gold IDY because of the extra sugar in the recipe.


                                              11 oz/330g  All Purpose (plain flour) flour  - I used KAAP flour


                                              pinch of salt


                                              3 oz/90g  Unsalted butter, plus extra for cake pan  -  I used my round metal pizza pan


                                              3 oz/90g Granulated sugar  -  I used Extra fine baking sugar


                                              grated zest of 1 lemon   -  Large organic off my tree


                                              2 Eggs


                                              1 Tbsp. Confectioners' sugar  -  I used extra for added sweetness


 


      Place the lukewarm water in a small bowl.  Sprinkle the yeast on top of the water and let stand until dissolved and foamy, about 10 minutes.


      Heap the flour on a work surface and make a well in the center.  Pour the dissolved yeast into the well and add the salt.  With a fork, gradually work in the flour until all of it is absorbed.  On a lightly floured surface, knead the dough until it is smooth and elastic, about 5 minutes.  Shape the dough into a ball.  Transfer the dough ball to a lightly floured bowl and cover with plastic wrap.  Let rise at room temperature until doubled in bulk, about 2 hours.


      Turn the dough out onto a floured work surface.  Punch down the dough and gradually work in the 1/3 cup (3oz/90g) butter, granulated sugar, lemon zest and the eggs, one at a time.  Lift the now-soft dough and slam it down on a hard surface several times.  Using the heel of your hand, knead until the dough is no longer sticky.


      Butter a 9-in (23-cm) round cake pan.  Shape the dough in the bottom of the prepared pan.  Let rise at room temperature until doubled in size, about 1 hour.  Meanwhile, preheat an oven to 400F 9200C).


      Bake the cake until just golden, about 30 minutes.  Remove from the pan and immediately transfer to a wire rack.  Sprinkle with the confectioners' sugar.  Cool to room temperature before serving. 


Sylvia


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


                                              


 

Comments

ehanner's picture
ehanner

Very interesting Sylvia!


So it's a lemon enriched sweet bread. Sounds delicate and delicious.


Eric

SylviaH's picture
SylviaH

A good one for Lint!


Sylvia

SylviaH's picture
SylviaH

I think because of the way it was mixed it takes on more of a cake texture and is refered to as cake in the recipe!  If I didn't know better I would never guess there was yeast in this cake.  I guess you would call it cake leavened with yeast?


Sylvia

korish's picture
korish

It looks so fluffy and moist. Sounds like a good cake for a cup of hot tea.

SylviaH's picture
SylviaH

Yes a cup of tea sounds wonderful.


Sylvia

davidg618's picture
davidg618

Wonderful! I'm always looking for foods that pair with wine. I think I'll make this as a dessert for our next dinner party, and pair it with some macerated berries, and ice wine. Lemon flavor seems to pair with almost any fruit, and most white wines.


Thanks for your post.


David G.


Love the "carnival" pictures!

SylviaH's picture
SylviaH

Fresh fruit goes wonderful with this cake.


Sylvia

trailrunner's picture
trailrunner

I wish I had a slice to go with my hot tea on a cold rainy day like today. I can almost smell the lemony fragrance. Thank you for posting , I will look up that book as I am not familiar with it. c

SylviaH's picture
SylviaH

This is a large cook book with lovely pictures and recipes from Italy, there are only a few bread recipes.

Sylvia

mete's picture
mete

That reminded me of a recipe I developed and haven't made for a while . If I may ! Yeast based  sour cream  'coffee cake '? For a 9" pan


3 cups all purpose flour                                                                                    


1 cup sour cream


2 Tablespoons honey


1/4 cup butter


2 eggs


Package of yeast


Pinch of salt and grated lemon rind  [or vanilla if prefered]


This is very light [even with sour cream] ,  not sweet ,with delicate flavor, perfect for coffee or wine . My Italian genes must have been working !


                                                                                       


 

turosdolci's picture
turosdolci

Carnevale is celebrated in February just before Lent with colorful festivals all over Italy. Masquerade balls, entertainment, music, spectacular papier–mâché floats and of course “dolci traditionali di Carnevale”. Often the words breads/cakes are used interchangeably because they have a number of sweet breads that are not the texture of breads or cakes. For example I have read many comments questioning if Panettone is a bread or a cake. It is a sweet bread. I have this book and copied your recipe which I will try in celebration of Carnevale.


I have a post on ”Fritelle de Carnevale”a fried cookie that is dusted in confectionary sugar also one of the key cookies of the Carnevale. http://turosdolci.wordpress.com/2009/08/07/a-cookie-that-speaks-to-you-chiacchiere/


I love the pictures and I paint these Carnevale characters.


 

SylviaH's picture
SylviaH

I hope you enjoy this 'Carnevale' recipe!  I have been wanting to make this recipe for some time.  I would love to be in Italy this time of year to enjoy the celebration. What a beautiful site it must be to see all the costumes and the food has to out of this world.  I hope you post a picture of your  Sweet Carnival Pizza here or a reference to it...I admire your baking and your recipes.  The  traditional fried cookie sounds wonderful.


Sylvia 

mete's picture
mete

Years back I spent a long afternoon making a big batch of chiacchiere or cenci .Unfortunately that evening a group of people dropped in for a visit - and ate all the days work ! Yes, you can't have just one !!

crymad's picture
crymad

And like yours, both my attempts were disasters. Disasters making the dough, not the final results, which were in fact quite delicious. No amount of kneading, however, will produce a "no longer sticky dough" as described in the original recipe. The first dough is far too dry, and incorporating the eggs and butter into that tight ball produces a gruesome mass resembling wet sticky spaetzel.

Did your experience mirror mine?

SylviaH's picture
SylviaH

'gruesome mass resembling wet sticky spaetzel' you got it 'lol' ... this bread is not one I care to attempt again...I'd rather mix brioche...I think this recipe would do well with a very strong mixer...which I don't have.


Sylvia

crymad's picture
crymad

I'm going to stick with it, so to speak, as its not-too-rich bread/cake finish is very appealing. I've looked at some of the recipes in Italian on the web, and that dry doughball to start doesn't appear to be the norm. If I hit on something good, I'll let you know.