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noob question on digital scales, what is meant by this?

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koloatree's picture
koloatree

noob question on digital scales, what is meant by this?

150 lbs./75 kg x .05 lb./0.02 kg


http://stage.edlundco.com/catalog/product.cgi/8/19/48/411/P1/default/N/0


Hi,


I just wanted to clarify something for myself. Is this saying the weight capacity is 150lbs and can measure up to .05lbs of accuracy?


Thanks,

flournwater's picture
flournwater

http://www.edlundco.com/pdf/ERSScales_Sheet_051409.pdf


Sure looks like that what it says.   Accuracy over that range?  They claim +/- 1% for their TE-150 so I'd expect this one to be rated similarly.  But these things can run upwards of $300, and (IMO) the accuracy claims are subject to question.

koloatree's picture
koloatree

Hi,


Thank you for the quick reply. I am also looking at this model


 


http://www.instawares.com/bds-8kgls-bakers-dough-scale.edl-bds8kgls.0.7.htm


Scale - Baker's Dough - 8 kg x 5 gm graduation - epoxy


Therefore it is accurate up to 8 kg with a +/- 5gm.


 

Falsehat's picture
Falsehat

The large number is the maximum capacity of the scale.


The smaller number is NOT its accuracy.


For your example, 0.02kgm is the smallest divisionon on the scale (20 grams)


Accuracy (including repeatability) is another matter and is directly related to cost.

koloatree's picture
koloatree

Thank you,


Is there a term/value that defines the range of accuracy? 


 


I am shopping for 2 scales. The first scale will be used to weigh bulk ingredients ~40-70lbs at a time, and the second scale to weigh ingredients of less than 10 lbs at a time. 

Falsehat's picture
Falsehat

Scale accuracy is a slippery subject.


If you are using the scale for commercial purposes then you MUST have the scale certified by the appropriate authority and it is to be re-certified every so often if it is still being used commercially, i.e. selling product by weight.


If not, your concern for accuracy should be a function of the items value. A 150 lb scale for measuring dirt is considerably different than for weighing a valuable commodity.


As always, it boils down to you get what you pay for. 


In general, a stated accuracy of say 1% means it is accurate within 1% of the scales maximum weight. A 10 lb item on a 150 lb. scale is accurate within 1.5 lb. Not very accurate, is it?


I have little faith in inexpensive electonic scales yet I appreciate the ease of reading the scale.


A balance scale is the most accurate at a reasonable price. A spring scale also has good accuracy over its complete range as it behaves to Cook's (sp?) Law.


For bread making, my experience, 5-10% by weight for all items produces great bread.

koloatree's picture
koloatree

Thank you Falsehat, I appreciate the insight.