The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

wheat starter question

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sadutar's picture
sadutar

wheat starter question

What flour should I use for a wheat surdough starter? Whole-grain or plain white? I'm confused and I can't find the answer anywhere. Do they make different kinds of starters? How and why? I've already one starter bubbling that I made with white flour but now this started troubling me...

SourdoLady's picture
SourdoLady

You can make your starter out of whatever kind of flour that you want to. You can also use a white starter to make whole wheat bread, if you so desire. You can convert a portion of an existing white starter to whole wheat (or rye) by taking a small amount of it and then feeding it with the new flour. You may find that the wheat and rye starters will produce a more sour tasting bread.

sadutar's picture
sadutar

I just baked some breads with the wheat starter I made, but apparently it wasn't strong enough because they didn't rise at all. They didn't taste bad but I wouldn't call them bread anyway ;P I was just wondering if the whole wheat flour would have more power because it has everything in it. I'll have to try that next!

SourdoLady's picture
SourdoLady

Sadutar, are you new to sourdough baking or have you used it before? The reason I ask is that I thought maybe you weren't aware that sourdough takes much longer to rise than commercial yeast doughs do and maybe you didn't wait long enough for it to rise. Most of the time a dough made with sourdough will just sit there and appear to be doing no rising at all for quite some time. You must be patient, as it will rise. Many times it can take several hours. If your starter is bubbly and active your dough will rise.

sadutar's picture
sadutar

I've baked sour rye bread this last autumn, but this was my first time with wheat sour. I followed one recipe where the breads were left in cool place over night to rise but mine didn't. So my starter wasn't very active.