The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

taste development

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sybram's picture
sybram

taste development

My husband and I prefer white bread over wheat, rye and other alternate breads,  but I am committed to developing a healthier lifestyle with exercise and whole grain breads.   I wish I could say we like them, but we really don't.  Do you just make yourself eat them and hope you develop a taste for whole wheat and rye?  How did the rest of you get use to whole grains and different flours if you weren't brought up eating them?  Need advice.


Syb

flournwater's picture
flournwater

I never liked whole grain breads until I found that "whole grains" weren't all alike.  I tried commercial brands and selected a few that had a nice flavor and texture and focused on those as foundations for my own styles.  I've never duplicated them perfectly, but I'm satisfied with the formulas that I have been able to develop.


Perhaps you'd find whole grain breads more enjoyable by toasting them and using them in strata recipes, etc.  Those might be ways to get to know them better.


Flavor in whole grain breads depends on the type of whole grains used, the fortifiers that might be added and several other factors.  There are so many different rye breads, some with a strong rye flavor and others more subtle, and that might not be the best place to start.  Why not try a quick inventory of the bread section in your favorite super market and count the number of whole grain breads.  Then look at the list of ingredients.  I'll bet you'll find something that strikes your fancy.   I have a personal favorite (I'm trying to duplicate the texture/flavor myself) Oat and Hazelnut Bread sold by Safety (Safeway Select).

sybram's picture
sybram

Thanks, Flournwater.  I really am ready to branch out, so I'll be trying some of the suggested formulas soon.


Syb

theilff's picture
theilff

I used to dislike whole wheat, etc.  But several things happened.  1) I started putting whole grains in cookies (oats, and ground wheat) and I noticed that I stayed full longer, and it actually had a richer, less sweet taste.  Cookies might be a fun way to experiment.


You don't need to start off using 100% whole wheat, and if you tried it with rye you might end up with a mess (it takes practice).  Start mixing proportions and see what you like.  5, 10, 20, 30% wheat or rye to white.   You will probably notice a change in your tastes as your realize the flavors are dramatically more complex and the food satisfies you far better.


Also, if your using bleached, do yourself a favor and immediantly start using unbleached flour (if you don't believe me, read about the differences).  The nutrition level will improve significantly, and you won't really notice a taste or appearance difference (it was my first step). 


Testimonial:  Because of these simple steps (switching from bleached to unbleached and small percentage mixins), I am now looking to buy a grain mill!



Give it time and don't rush yourself.  In my experience, the body tends to crave things once it realizes it can get more of what it needs from those things.

sybram's picture
sybram

A grain mill--Oh my goodness!  You really did get into it, didn't you?  I do use unbleached flour, and the wheat breads I've made so far(just a couple) were a mix of white and wheat, but maybe I started out with too much wheat.  My husband's diabetes and my dieting do complicate things a bit, as I don't do much in the way of cookies or other sweets.  So, not much diversity in my baking.  Bread and bread.


Syb  

ellabellie's picture
ellabellie

Perhaps visit a bakery and sample their freshly baked bread. Preferably naturally leavened bread. White sourdough or Italian can be tasty and still have the flavor of a slow processed bread. There are sourdoughs or levain breads that take hours to make by fermentation and the use of starters and sponges in the long process and you can taste the flavor, a natural sweetness sometimes that compliments the grain.


 

sybram's picture
sybram

I'm really enjoying my sourdough baking, but I haven't used it with the wheat breads yet.  Soon, I hope.

Edith Pilaf's picture
Edith Pilaf

But I read an old post here when I first visited the site a few months ago, about a 100% whole wheat sandwich loaf made with buttermilk and honey that made it sound scrumptious-- I had to try it, and it was indeed delicious.  Now I make 2 loaves a week, and we have it every morning for breakfast.  It makes the best toast.  We use stone ground dark spring wheat and the taste and texture are most appealing.  It wasn't a matter of learning to like it... it was just that good!


I still don't see myself trying whole grains in cookies, pastries, pizza or baguettes, etc.   But it's a start.  Maybe if you find that one recipe you like, you can introduce some whole grain into your diet.


One thing I discovered is that commercial whole wheat bread tastes nothing like the one I make.  I know that's one reason I've never liked the stuff.

sybram's picture
sybram

Thanks Edith.  Your experience gives me hope.  Others have suggested that same wheat sandwich loaf.  I'll be trying it soon.


Syb

cognitivefun's picture
cognitivefun

I didn't like whole wheat until I ground my own. I got a mill and started grinding my own flour and the taste is so great, like fine wine, that I will never go back. It is so much more satisfying to use home ground fresh flour.


Sourdough breads with whole rye, red winter wheat, white winter wheat, durum, corn, soft spring wheat...the possibilities are endless and the flavors are so great.


No going back for me.

celestica's picture
celestica

the Laurel's Whole Wheat Buttermilk with Biga on this site is delicious...made to direction it turns out perfectly every time.


 


 

Edith Pilaf's picture
Edith Pilaf

Here's the article by JMonkey that got my interest in make a 100% whole wheat bread.  It's based on Laurel's buttermilk whole wheat, but using a biga:


http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/1073/biga-vs-straight-dough-whole-wheat-buttermilk-bread-experiment


You might give it a try.

sybram's picture
sybram

Grinding your own grains sounds like so much fun, but I think that's a ways off for me.  But who knows--if my husband and I learn to like it................maybe sooner than I think.

shakleford's picture
shakleford

I've always preferred the taste of whole wheat, but many who don't have been happy with white wheat.  It's a whole grain with the same nutritional properties as traditional red wheat, but is much lower in tannins, the substance in red wheat that some people dislike.  You should be able to find whole white wheat flour at just about any grocery store, although you may have to puchase a premium brand (eg, King Arthur).

sybram's picture
sybram

Thanks for the suggestion, Shakleford.  I have checked for the white wheat flour at WalMart.  I think I'll call aroung to the other area stores as well.  Thanks again.  s