The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

about to use bannentons for the 1st time

mabaker's picture
mabaker

about to use bannentons for the 1st time

Hi!

 

Got a few proffing baskets with liners (willow)and few without (the coild =I guess they are called brattforms- that makes that nice shapes on the bread).

If I have semolina can I dust it with it? or only the 50-50 rye flour Ap? don't have it at home right now.

I use them only for final proof, right? (after the dough has proofed before). My recipe calls to proof for 2 hours and shape and proof for another hour-so I understand the proofing will be after I'm cutting and shaping the dough and then proofing at the baskets- right?

Some say to grease it before...but I don't think it's a good idea- what do u do?

Thanks a lot!

 

hutchndi's picture
hutchndi

Ack! Don't grease those nice bannetons!

Do yourself and the bannetons a favor and avoid alot of headaches and get some rice flour, rub it into the coils really well before each (final proofing only) use.

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

and you still won't know what to do.  I don't like the rancid smell oil can get so I don't oil mine.  I mix up rice flour and AP flour (1 to 4) and put it into a sprinkler jar with lid.  I dust them with this.  Not only the brotform, but a light dust on the dough too before it lands against the coils. 

The last loaf I used a wooden sauna bucket.  It was untreated wood, oval and had straight sides tapered smaller at the bottom.  I was thinking that before I got it messed up with sauna oil, I was going to try this object.  I dusted it with flour filling in the sharp corners at the bottom and it worked like a charm!  It has been added to my bread cupboard and I have to find a new sauna bucket.  It was too small anyway!  The nice thing about the flat bottom is that I could easitly take a monogram or some decoration that would show up on my inverted loaves....  Another project.

Mini

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

works great and tastes good too.  Use plenty.  You can also mix flours.  Not using anything would be a disaster.

cognitivefun's picture
cognitivefun

rice flour seems to be much better than wheat flour to prevent sticking

davidg618's picture
davidg618

semolina is fine. You'll have to work a bit harder to get the semolina to stick to, and hold in the grooves--rub it in with your hand--but there's no reason not to use it. That said, like most of the folks in the posts above, I prefer rice flour (I use brown rice flour) to AP, or semolina. Rye would be my last choice, especially for moderately wet (68%-70% hyd.) doughs, where sticking is a strong possibility.

Recently, because I've been experimenting with moderately wet doughs, I switched from AP flour to rice flour to dust my proofing linen.

David G

mabaker's picture
mabaker

I mixed half Ap and half semolina.

I wanted to upload the pic but it doesn't let me and fails all the time- don't know why!

 

Thank you!

hutchndi's picture
hutchndi

Probably too big, as there is a size restriction, not sure exactly what it is. I resize my pics by 30% before I am allowed to upload them.

soleilnyc's picture
soleilnyc

Once the dough has risen, how do you invert the form so that the dough doesn't collapse?  I've been following some pretty high hydration recipes, and without a parchment sling, moving the dough seems like a question of life and death for me each time (like those people on Food Network who have to move their tower of cake from one table to the next). 

And when you invert, does it get inverted straight into the stone or the dutch oven or whatever, or does it go onto a peel or board?

 

hutchndi's picture
hutchndi

When your dough has risen in the banneton sufficiently, place a parchment square slightly larger than the banneton rim over the top. Place your cutting board or peel over the parchment, hold the banneton and the cutting board together and invert. Tap the upside down banneton until the dough seperates. Now you have a right side up dough on parchment on a platform ready to slide into the oven.

I stressed about this for awhile until I started doing it this way, works like a charm every time.

Russ from RI

soleilnyc's picture
soleilnyc

I learned something new today! :)

Just because you seem to know a bit about it, is this any different from handling breads risen in cloth-lined forms? I just got one for Christmas and tried dusting it with rice flour, but the dough kind of stuck and didn't hold the oval shape it rose in.

Soleil

hutchndi's picture
hutchndi

Sorry, never had the cloth lined form, just coiled bannetons, and only round ones, so I can't really make a comparison. I have used bowls and such with well dusted muslin cloth or napkins, but that is different still as the "lining" isn't attached.