The Fresh Loaf

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Yeast rolls - dough too wet - help!

mediter's picture
mediter

Yeast rolls - dough too wet - help!

I have a question about yeast rolls.

I followed this recipe, and ran into a problem with the dough being too wet (or so I think).

I'm a novice when it comes to baking, so I'm not sure what to expect.
I measured all the ingredients out perfectly, but the dough was so wet that it didn't even resemble dough. Kneading was impossible. I gradually added an additional cup of flour just to get it to a kneadable point. It was still extremely sticky & wet.

What did I do wrong?
Thank you :)

EDIT
http://i3.photobucket.com/albums/y86/reveur_mediter/bauplate.jpg
The finished product.

My thoughts: They bread doesn't taste sweet enough. Common sense tells me it's because I added so much additional flour, thus diminishing the amount of sugar. The texture seems perfect. Nice, soft yeast rolls. Just wish they were a bit more sweet. It's OK, next time I'll have a better grasp of what I'm doing thanks to all your helpful tips. :)

droidman's picture
droidman

I have been able to work with pretty wet doughs by dusting the counter, the dough, and my hands with flour, and using a really light touch.


How did they turn out after you added the extra flour?

mediter's picture
mediter

Thanks for responding :)

I did dust my hands & parchment paper with flour, but it was just soooo wet & drippy! It wouldn't keep its form & was instantly absorbing the flour on my hands & paper.

I *was* able to lightly knead it after adding the extra flour, but it was still very difficult to manage. It's sitting to rise now & I'll post an update with the end result. I've made yeast rolls maybe 2 or 3 times when i was very small (helping my mom) and I do remember the dough being pretty gooey - but not super wet like this.

mrfrost's picture
mrfrost

The recipe calls for extra flour for kneading. You can edd enough extra flour necessary, enough to handle the dough, as per the recipe.

mediter's picture
mediter

Haha - thank you for pointing out something that I had missed!

Franko's picture
Franko

This is a tricky dough for anyone not used to working with a sloppy dough.


Not all flours have the same absorption capacity, and it also depends on the water you are using. If the recipe was developed using a hard mineralized water you would need to use less water than the recipe calls for if your water is soft. Water varies from region to region as does flour. The recipe describes the type of dough it should be and how it forms in the processor. Use that as a guide more than the flour/water/liquid ratio itself. The recipe suggests that it will be a wet dough, but adjust it only as much as you need to so you can work with it. Over time the more you work with wet doughs the easier it is to handle them. I would also suggest using a dough scraper when working with a wet dough . Using a scraper you can pick up a dough, slap it down on your table, smear it out and by very gradually adjusting the flour content, develop the gluten enough so that it's workable by hand.

mediter's picture
mediter

This is very helpful information. I'm to the stage now where I've got the dough separated into individual balls. In about 10 minutes I'll be adding a spicy pork stuffing, then baking. I promise to post pictures. The dough is still very wet & sticky, but workable.

mrfrost's picture
mrfrost

For the next time you may try the recipe, you might keep in mind what the poster said when introducing the recipe: "...It is a very easy dough to work with...".


Obviously, considering how this dough is often used(filled buns, etc.), it's probably not too sticky.

dwcoleman's picture
dwcoleman

Also, you should convert volumes to weights with a scale. Then you can determine the correct amount of hydration desired.


A yeast roll would probably be in the 55-65% hydration range.  Meaning 500g of flour would require 275-325g of total liquid(water, milk, eggs, etc).


Since you are a novice I would recommend The Bread Bakers Apprentice by Peter Reinhart, or Bread by Jeffrey Hamelman.  Each have a thorough explanation of bakers math, as well as the stages of making bread.

mrfrost's picture
mrfrost

A link is in the original post: "this" recipe. Weights given.

Franko's picture
Franko

I think they look very good ! The experience you gained doing them is a big bonus as well. Nice work.

mediter's picture
mediter

Thank you! :)