The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Ciabatta Bread

bobkay1022's picture
bobkay1022

Ciabatta Bread

Good Morning,


   Having had good luck with Jasons Ciabatta I wanted to go one step further.  I tried Peter Reinhart Pooklish version on Page 136. I used a scale for every thing. My poolish was 3 days old and looked perfect.


After mixing as instructed every thing exxcept the poolish I then added my poolish. From the start i could see I was in deep what ever. It was so dry. I added about 4 more  ounces of water and it was still very dry. 


 I took it out of the KA and put it on a kneading mat.  I folded well attempted to and cut into two pieces.  I let rest for 30 min.  It really still looked like a loaf already baked.  I folded again and let rest for 2 + hours. It did a good rise.  I could tell that it vwas not going to have the crumb that Ciabatta has but put it in the oven and baked as if it was going to be a Ciabatta loaf.  If nothing else the birds would still love my bread .


  It baked perfectly fairly good crust and a very firm crumb as I expected. It almost seems like I was lacking a lot more water but just how much more not sure. Should i have been baking with my hands or trying to do the formular/recipe and just adding more water.


  The bread had a goodCiabatta  taste but not even close to Caibatta crumb.    Any ideas.               


     Have a nice day


             Mr. Bob


www.siemnann.us


 


 


 


 

mrfrost's picture
mrfrost

In the BBA(Bread Baker's Apprentice), Reinhart, "apparently", is writing the (ciabatta)recipe from the viewpoint that the reader may not be used to handling a wet dough. In the commentary, he advises that with experience, hydration could/should be increased; ie. "the wetter the better".


Jason's formula, at 95% hydration, is considerably wetter than Reinhart's max hydration of about 73%, as written(if I'm not mistaken).


Reinhart advises that hydration can be increased considerably, as long as one is able to continue doing the stretch and folds as prescribed.


 


 

bobkay1022's picture
bobkay1022

Hello Mr. Frost


Thanks for the quick reply. Still a novice and I should have known things were not right. I have to learn to deal with different  Formulas /Recipes with differnt bakers.   Have to try what you mentioned. For some reason I started in the middle of the book as usual instead of reading every thing from start to finish.


Thanks again,


Mr. Bob

flournwater's picture
flournwater

Going back and reading the book from the beginning, before tackling some of the bread challenges, will help you greatly.  Now you're on the right track.


Even so, I also found that Ciabatta formula in BBA produced what I thought was an unusually stiff dough.  When I compare the results of the formula to the image on page 137 I find it difficult to believe that the crumb pictured there resulted from the formula suggested for making the bread.   I would expect that from a much wetter dough.


 

bobkay1022's picture
bobkay1022

Thanks for the comment. I agree very confusing. Every thing was ok but the crumb and I knew almost from the start after putting the poolish in I was in deep trouble. Stiff dough would come close ??  Oh well thats what the forum is about helping other realize there mistakes are not always a mistake. Thanks to people like you.


Have a nice week


Mr. Bob


www.siemann.us

mrfrost's picture
mrfrost

Page 136, Commentary, Ciabatta Poolish Version:


"...As you become comfortable with wet dough, you may want to try increasing the hydration and stickiness of the dough. The wetter the better, as long as it holds together enough to make the stretch and fold manuevers. It is during the stretching and folding that the gluten has a chance to strengthen, resulting in the large holes so distinctive and prized in this bread..."


ps: Maybe this commentary is not in all editions of the book?

bobkay1022's picture
bobkay1022

Thanks for the reply


 I agree 100% and I should have known better but following a recipe to the word I guess not always the exact formula.  I will experiment more with that recipe for sure as I enjoy  Ciabatta bread and the flavor from a poolish starter.


Thanks again,


Mr. Bob


www.siemann.us

Edith Pilaf's picture
Edith Pilaf

but I just use part of the flour and water from Jason's recipe for a poolish and his mixing technique.  I've tried reducing the water to get a better-handling dough, but you really lose that magnificent crumb you get with 95% hydration.  Such a wet dough is beyond my skills...  It makes a mess trying to flip it over onto the peel, but I manage.  The dough is amazingly forgiving-- I just scoop it all back together and into the oven.  It comes out great every time. 


Sorry,  this thread is not about Jason's recipe, but since you already have had luck with it, just adapt it to Reinhart's poolish formula.