The Fresh Loaf

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Swiss Cantonal Breads

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tssaweber's picture
tssaweber

Swiss Cantonal Breads

It has been quite some time since I posted on my favorite website. But (un)fortunately the business and consulting world is holding me up from blogging and bread baking. But before I disappear again in the offices of the corporate world in upstate NY, I wanted to share this picture I found by accident in one of my old bread books today.


 


My in-laws from Switzerland have celebrated New Year with us here in the super cold Midwest and brought a crown for the 3 Kings Day (1/6/2010) with them. Of course it was their expectation that I bake the traditional "Drei Koenigs Kuchen". I had to find a recipe for this to happen, but I guess I was successful.


 




I still have to work on the formula to fine tune it, but it is more or less an enhanced Zopf dough. If done I will post the formula. If some of the Swiss TFLer have their own it would be great if they could share. During the search for this recipe I found the page shared above. Of course now my quest begins to find all this cantonal formulas, bake and adapt them to the US environment.


 


Happy New Year to all.


Thomas

Comments

LindyD's picture
LindyD

Those photos from your old bread book are treasures, Thomas.  The bottom right round of the left photo reminds me of some of Hansjokamin's recent bakes.  Thanks for posting them.


Your own bread is quite spectacular as well.  Or at least, what was left of it!


Happy New Year.

tssaweber's picture
tssaweber

Thanks LindyD for your comments and your right the bread was gone in minutes, which I guess is a good sign for a home baker.


Thomas

Paddyscake's picture
Paddyscake

Thanks for sharing the pictures from your old bread books on shapes. Love it!


Wishing you and yours all the best, Thomas.


Betty

tssaweber's picture
tssaweber

Thanks and the same to you and your family.


Thomas

Salome's picture
Salome

Such a cute collection! I recognize many, but not all of them. My favourites out of these: the Graubünden bread is from Poschiavo and made out of rye, wheat and spiced with anise. Delicious. And the one from Wallis is a rye bread, often made with walnuts. jummyyy...And the Basel Bread can be very bland, but if it's made with such a devotion as you do Thomas it's a highlight as well.


Thanks for sharing this treasure.


I've scheduled baking the Dreikönigskuchen, too. I love all these customs!


Salome

tssaweber's picture
tssaweber

As you know a grew up in the Wallis so I'm very familiar with this bread. Unfortunately my family doesn't like rye breads so it makes no sense to bake it.


Looking forward to your Drei Koenigs Kuchen.


Thomas

chouette22's picture
chouette22

And of course I recognize the two books you have showing under that top one - the green one having been used in Swiss schools to teach the children cooking and baking. I still use it sometimes for some basics like "Griessschnitten" (my kids love those sometimes for breakfast) or sauces and such.


Just like Salome, I will certainly not miss making the Dreikoenigskuchen (to correct the forgetting of the Grittibaenzen :), but I must admit, I have become a little unfaithful of the Swiss tradition in recent years. Here in the US I am very much involved in the French community (Michigan - Automotive Industry - tons of French here!) and have adopted their "Galette des rois" (Three Kings Cake), because it is so incredibly delicious. Before coming here I had never tasted it. I'll post about it, but will most likely be making several of them only on Sunday (to invite friends).

tssaweber's picture
tssaweber

Thanks Chouette and I'm amazed that you recognized the green "Husi Kochbuch". It is my wife's and she still uses it from time to time especially to make "Spaetzli". Venison, Spaetzli and Rotkraut with a morel cream sacuce, yummi.


I'm looking forward to hear see your galette des rois.


 


Thomas

hansjoakim's picture
hansjoakim

Thanks for sharing, Thomas!


I'm intrigued by many of the regional loaves that are displayed on the photo. Particularly those for St. Gallen/Appenzell/Thurgau. Can you tell anything more about those?

tssaweber's picture
tssaweber

Thanks Hansjoakim


Unfortunately the book has only this picture in it but not the formulas for all this breads.


All three breads are so called Buerli Brot and indeed very good. When I'm home the next time I will see what I can find out. I think I have a recipe for the St. Galler Buerli Brot.


I will let you know.


Thomas

snowbrocade's picture
snowbrocade

oh, yum I cant wait for you to post that recipe.  I had buerli in switzerland last year every chance I could get and it was awesome!

Swissbread's picture
Swissbread

Sponge:


1000 gr Water


1300 gr Half White Flour


12 gr  Instant Yeast


Ferment 4 - 5 Hr.


 


Dough:


2000 gr Water


2200 gr Half White Flour


12 gr Instant Yeast


90 gr Salt


Add Sponge + Water then add all other ingredients.


Ferment 90 Min. folding the dough 3 times.


Good Proof , Very hot oven with steam.


Good Luck, En Guete


 

ques2008's picture
ques2008

wish i had that book in my collection.


your bread looks lovely, looking forward to the formula once you find it!

tssaweber's picture
tssaweber

Thanks ques2008. As soon as I have the formula for this bread fintuned and tested I will share it with you.


Thomas

hanseata's picture
hanseata

Here's another recipe for Bürli - I don't know from which canton (they look like the ones from Uri). I made it several times, they taste really good. I adapted the recipe to overnight cold fermentation and stretch and fold technique.


Karin


 


SWISS BÜRLI


DOUGH
360 - 480 g water, warm (95 F), (1 1/2 - 2 cups)
7 g instant yeast
100 g starter, rye or whole wheat, activated
375 g bread flour
375 g whole wheat flour, or spelt flour
1 tbsp. honey, or maple syrup
2 tbsp. salt


 


DAY 1

Dissolve yeast in 360 g water. Add to all other ingredients and mix 1 - 2 min. at low speed, until coarse ball forms. Let dough rest for 5 min.

Resume kneading at medium-low speed for 2 min., adjusting with more water as needed. Dough should still be somewhat sticky. Continue kneading for another 4 min., the last 20 seconds at medium-high speed. Dough should be very tacky, verging on sticky.

Transfer dough to lightly floured work surface. Stretch and fold 4 times, with 10 min. intervals (resting in a lightly oiled bowl). After last S & F, cover and refrigerate overnight (I divide the dough already in 4 portions).


 


DAY 2

Remove dough from refrigerator 2 hrs. before using, dough should double. (Preheat oven after 1 hr.)

Preheat oven to 500 F, including steam pan. Line 2 baking sheets with parchment paper.

Divide dough into 16 equal pieces, shape into rolls, and place them two and two touching each other, seam side down, on baking sheets. Let rolls ferment for 30 - 45 min., or until they have grown 1 1/2 times their original size.

Bake rolls at 450 F for 10 min., steaming with 1 cup of boiling water. Rotate sheets, remove steam pan, and continue baking for another 15 min. (internal temperature at least 200 F)

Let cool on wire rack.

rossnroller's picture
rossnroller

What is the hydration of the starter in your Swiss Bürli recipe, please?


Have you tried it without adding dry yeast, by the way?


Cheers
Ross

hanseata's picture
hanseata

Ross, I found this recipe years ago in a German website, the original says only: "wheat barm", without specification. I made it with my 75% hydration whole wheat starter.


I just looked it up again, the original has 42 g fresh yeast (=14 g instant yeast) - way too much, so I reduced it by half. I never tried it without yeast, so far, but I'm sure it would work fine.


I baked the Bürli several times, adapting the flour combination to what I had, and what worked. In the original it's half type 405 (the German all-purpose flour, but more in between US pastry and AP) and half type 1050 (often used for bread baking, resembles US first clear flour). So my version has about a quarter more whole wheat content, I think.


It's a while ago I baked them, but we liked them a lot, and this discussion made me think of making them again.


Karin


 

snowbrocade's picture
snowbrocade

thanks everyone for the recipes--I cant wait to try them!

rossnroller's picture
rossnroller

Looking forward to trying this one.


Cheers
Ross

Sweetrockfarm's picture
Sweetrockfarm

Hello Thomas


I just stumbled upon TFL and found your blogs. I can't wait to start reading them.  I bake often, but not often enough. Zopf has become a favorite request of my extended family, as well as some others such as Zuri Burli, all with at least some rye. 


What is the name of that book with the pictures of the cantonal breads?  I would love to know and find out if my father has it in his chef's collection.


 


Cheers!


Diane

tssaweber's picture
tssaweber

Hey Diane,


The name of the book is: Abnehmen mit Brot - mit Brot geht's leichter. I got it from Migros a long time ago.


Unfortunately it has no formulas in it, only recipes how to use bread and not gain weight.


Hope that helps.


 


Thomas