The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

How much water do I add to ground flax and wheat bran in bread?

celestica's picture
celestica

How much water do I add to ground flax and wheat bran in bread?

I am adding some ground flax and wheat bran to a bread I love to make- for flavour and nutrition.  


How much water should I add to compensate for 60 g of ground flax and 40 g of wheat bran?  I started with 1/4 c but the bread seemed a little drier and denser.


Thanks!


 


 

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

I would add the water to them before adding to the dough.  Take your 100g of flax and bran and add enough water to make a thick paste and let stand 30 minutes.  If it get thicker and drier add more water until it resembles your dough and then add to the dough and blend in. 


My guess would be anywhere from 60g to 200g of added water.  So you could add a little bit more  1/4c being 59g.  Flax seeds soak up lots of moisture.


Mini

ananda's picture
ananda

Hi


Soak your flax/bran mix in boiling water @120% weight of flax/bran combination, and add salt @2%.   I don't do cups, sorry.   Bring back to the boil to gelatinise the starch in your flax.   Stir well, cover and leave ambient overnight.   Add this to your final dough.


This allows you to maximise the amount of water you can get in, thereby doing all possible to keep the crumb moist.   It also helps to release vital enzymes which will help with dough rheology as well.   You may need to make adjustments to the liquid element in your final dough, I haven't seen your full recipe spec.


Hamelman is very good on "soakers" if you have his book.


Best wishes


Andy

celestica's picture
celestica

Thank-you both for your answers.  I'll try your suggestions and let you know how it works out.  Maybe I'll post the recipe if I get it perfect.


 


 

celestica's picture
celestica

Hi again,


by 120% do you mean


60 g. bran


72 g. water?, then 1.2 g salt?


I tried this and the water did not even moisten all of the bran flakes.  So I kept going to make it 150 g water which made everything moist. Is my math suspect?


 


Thanks,


Celeste.


 


 


 

PeteInAz's picture
PeteInAz

I was under the impression that if you heat enzymes beyond around 150F, you run the risk of denaturing them.

ananda's picture
ananda

Hi


Reflecting on this and think you are correct.


The idea of the hot soaker is to create a mixed temperature of <66*C [sorry, I don't do *F, but I think that is just below the 150 mark?]


I had a good read through Hamelman, and realise salt is added to a hot soaker to prevent enzymatic reactions in the soaking stage, saving this for the  fermentation when the final dough is mixed.


I don't have Reinhart's Wholegrain book with me at home just now, but I know his section on Mash Bread is excelllent on this.


So, sorry, my advice to bring the soaked mix back to the boil is maybe not the best course of action.


However, my reasoning was to ensure maximum starch gelatinisation, therefore, maximum water take up.  No doubt you see where I'm coming from with this.


Thanks for pointing this out, and best wishes


Andy

ananda's picture
ananda

Looks right to me Celeste.


Don't forget to link this to your final recipe and adjust the final water as needed.


If you need help with that, send back with a copy of your formula and I can help out.


Thanks


Andy

celestica's picture
celestica

This is how it worked out - great colour, rise, texture, moisture, and about 60 people dug into the 3 kg. bread I made,


Soaker:


60 g. bran


150 g. hot water, soaked overnight


2% salt


Country Bread


420 g. 100% rye starter - 100% hydration


840 g. water


1260 g. flour (roughly 25% whole wheat, 3% wheat germ, 2% gluten, 70% unbleached all purpose)


2% salt


Stretch and fold 4 x during Bulk Rise - 6 hours


rest 30 min.


shape - overnight retard


Bake @ 450, turned down to 400....


Until done.


Served at the community centre in the woods - Vallican Whole Community Centre - Locavore's Feast (100 mile community potluck meal) - 100 mile meal.  Lots of home canned peaches, saskatoon berries, goat milk butter, home made cheese, deer, root vegetables, all kinds of good stuff.