The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

sourdough baked in a vintage pizza oven

HunterS's picture
HunterS

sourdough baked in a vintage pizza oven

Greetings Freshloafers. . . 


 


I've been lurking on this site for way too long without making a post and for the first time I took a pictures of a bake I had this past weekend!  The loafs are 10% whole rye 10% whole wheat 80% general mills gold medal bread flour.  There were all leavened with a 100% hydration sourdough starter made with bread flour.  This is the first time I used white rice flour to dust my bannetons/baskets and I it worked wonderfully, no sticking at all after proofing overnight!


 


 I proofed the loafs overnight at approximately 50 degrees Fahrenheit for 12 hours and used cornmeal for dusting the peal.  I am lucky enough to have family members that have a 50+ year-old Baker's Pride stone lined pizza oven in the their kitchen which I cranked up to 500-600 degrees to bake the loafs:


Oven closed


The Oven takes about 3 hours to get fully heated and can get as hot as 800 degrees. . . great for pizzas! 


Oven inside


Since it is a pizza oven it only has a height of about 12" so no huge loafs. . .   In order to create steam I placed a tin bowl filled with river stones in to which I poured into after the loafs were loaded.  I was also sure to bake all four loafs off at the same time since a full oven produces its own steam.


unbaked loafs


Two of loafs were proofed in cheap 1 dollar baskets:



and two were proofed in nice willow bannetons.  The dough was made using only one build.  I mixed all the ingredients in a 20 quart hobart mixer on speed 2 until the dough was ready then I let the dough rest for a few hours folding it every hour or so.  I used 2 lbs of dough in the cheap baskets and 1.5lb in the nice willow bannetons.  I forget to mention that I added some soaked wheat berries into the mix as well to give the crumb some texture.  Before presenting you with the next pictures let me explain that I have never had the opportunity to bake directly on stone in a very hot oven and therefore was not prepared for the crazy awesome oven bloom I got on my loafs!  I only put very smalls cuts into the loaf which led to this:



This loaf was the most affected by the heavy oven bloom.  


 


In case you are wondering I baked them this dark because I like my bread that way.  


Here are the rest:


circle cut FAIL haha


Super bloom!  Next time I will make deeper cuts. . .



Oh yes. . . 


I learned from this bake that baking good bread is most affected by the oven you are baking in then anything else in my opinion.  It is hard to beat baking a wood fired stone oven or even a vintage stone lined pizza oven like the one that was used in this bake.  Also cheap dollars baskets work just as well as imported german willow bannetons. . . . I forgot to take a picture of the crumb but it was very nice! Maybe I will add it later.


 


 


 

Comments

Crider's picture
Crider

A real pizza oven in their kitchen! I really like the idea except for the three hour warm-up time. It looks like they built it into their wall? Nice.

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

And they look so good too!   Just like you, I'd call it a Successful Bake!  Fun, food and learning all rolled into one exciting experience!   It's that "bloom" that makes them look so tasty too.   A few slashing problems, no big deal, and I like the improvised cooling rack.  Interesting round shapes.  Are those pizza pans for the oven?  Is pizza dough placed onto them before or after baking? 

juliette's picture
juliette

Hi! Beautiful loaves! Wondering how long your baking time was?

HunterS's picture
HunterS

I really didn't measure how long they were in the oven for but probably 12-25 minutes.  The racks are for made for pizza but I usually just cook pizza right on the stone.  They are best for cooking pizza in a oven without stone.  The raw dough is placed right onto the racks.