The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Slow risin'

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boosaman's picture
boosaman

Slow risin'

I have been baking challah bread for sometime, tinkering with a variety of recipes.  I have been using instant yeast, starting with a slurry (2.5 tsp. of yeast, 1/2 cup flour, 1/2 cup water, let rise for ten minutes until batter gets puffy) and then adding the slurry to the liquid ingredients, and then adding flour.  The challah is sweet; it contains both sugar and honey (and vanilla) (and another 3/4 cups of water, and some salt). 

While the results are good, it takes a good 3-4 hours to double in size during the first rise.  Any thoughts why this takes so long?

Thanks.

 Jack

Cooky's picture
Cooky

... and the fats. They make the bread delicious, but I believe they slow down the action of the yeast. No problem, really, because slow rise=great taste.

 

 

 

"I am not a cook. But I am sorta cooky."

boosaman's picture
boosaman

Thanks.  But I wonder.

 The original recipe is essentially what I have been using, although I am using instant yeast instead of active dry yeast, and have removed a cup of the water from the recipe.  The original recipe indicates that the bread should double within 1.5 hours or so.

 I wonder if it is the lack of water.

Cooky's picture
Cooky

Ah so. Yes, I bet you're right that a significantly lower amount of water would make the dough rise more slowly than the recipe indicates. The most important question is: Are you happy with the results? Does the finished loaf seem too dense? The challah recipes I've been trying out generally get great oven spring, whether they rise fast or slow. As long as the texture ends up reasonably light, I'm happy.

 

"I am not a cook. But I am sorta cooky."