The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Extra baking time for high hydtation breads

ron45's picture
ron45

Extra baking time for high hydtation breads

I love the ease and simplicity of stretch and fold methods. The slack [ well hydrated ] dough is gummy after normal backing time. I baked it in a soaked crockery pan with a cover in a  conventional over removing the cover for the last 15 minutes or so. Is there a way to estimate additiional baking time? Or, it's occuring to me as I write that the baking method could be the problem. What say you?


Ron

Caltrain's picture
Caltrain

I've found that baking at lower temperatures for the second half does wonders against gummy crumbs and soft crusts. I usually bake, covered, at 425F for 25 minutes, then uncovered for 30-35 minutes at 350F, and, if needed, baking for an extra 10 minutes at a time.

ron45's picture
ron45

Thank you to Janknitz, flournwater and Caltran for the help. I feel like I have a better chance on the next go round with your advise. 


 


Ron

flournwater's picture
flournwater

A well hydrated dough will cook perfectly in my oven in about twenty - twenty five minutes.  But I don't use soaked crockery pans.  If I conver the loaf, it's in a dry pan.  The hydration of the dough provides all the steam I need to finish the loaf nicely.  I'd suggest you forget about timing your bread and using internal temperature to judge when it is ready to leave the oven and rest on the cooling rack.  I do use "time" as a guide, but it's only an indicator as to when I do my first test on the internal temperature of the loaf.  The temperature tells me how much time I might need to wait until the next temperature check but not when the bread will be done.each firm donI love the ease and simplicity of stretch and fold methods. The slack   I'm at the point now where I can fairly well judge when my loaves are over that minimum 195 degree mark but short of 210 degrees so it's easy to hit the goal every time.

Janknitz's picture
Janknitz

I agree, internal temp is key. And no need to soak the clay.