The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Bread sauce and toast

Mary Fisher's picture
Mary Fisher

Bread sauce and toast

Two questions, almost unrelated:


1) what's the point of bread sauce?


2) We have toast once a week, usually with whatever bread's in the bin. sometimes it's excellent, at other times it's less than perfect although the bread itself was very good.


My problem is that I'm so disorganised that I can never remember which recipe I used for the good toasting bread.


Can I have suggestion/s please, for a bread which will toast evenly and without holes?


Someone here will know. I suspect that the addition of a little fat or oil would help, perhaps a little sugar too. I promise that I'll try all recipes given and keep them - with comments.


TIA

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

What came first the sauce from the main dish or the bread to soak it up?


Don't quite know how to help you with toast.   That's a personal preference thing. 


Mini

Royall Clark's picture
Royall Clark

A rustic multi-grain bread.


I've made several loaves of this bread so far and have fun making changes to it. It is great toasted with just a little butter on top and a light drizzle of honey. The people I trade bread for eggs with fell in love with it. I got this recipe from All Recipe dot com.



 

4 cups all-purpose flour (500g)

1 1/2 cups whole wheat flour (180g)

1/2 cup rye flour (51g)

1/2 cup packed brown sugar

2 tablespoons sugar

2 (.25 ounce) packages active dry yeast (7g)

 

2 teaspoons salt (12g)

2 cups milk

1/2 cup water

3 tablespoons vegetable oil

 Changes I made to recipe:

 Left out all sugar

added ¼ cup honey

added ¼ cup molasses

½ cup quick oats (50g) Soaked in the hot milk

2 Tbs. Light flax seed (22g)

1 Tbs. Vital wheat gluten

I added the oats to the hot milk to soak

baked until internal temperature was 205*

 

Directions:

1.

In a mixing bowl, combine 2 cups all-purpose flour, whole wheat flour, rye flour, sugars, yeast and salt. In a saucepan, heat the milk, water and oil to 120 degrees F-130 degrees F. Add to dry ingredients; beat until smooth. Stir in enough remaining all purpose flour to form a soft dough. Turn onto a floured surface; knead until smooth and elastic, about 6-8 minutes. Place in a greased bowl, turning once to grease top. Cover and let rise in a warm place until doubled, about 1 hour. Punch dough down. Turn onto a lightly floured surface; divide into four pieces. Roll each into a 15-in. rope. Twist two ropes together; pinch ends to seal. Repeat with remaining dough. Place in two greased 9-in. x 5-in. x 3-in. loaf pans. Cover and let rise until doubled, about 45 minutes. Bake at 375 degrees F for 30-35 minutes or until golden brown. Remove from pans to wire racks to cool.

Mary Fisher's picture
Mary Fisher

Well since we never, ever have bread sauce the questions is irrelevant. We haven't liked bread sauce when we've had it served to us and our whole family keeps asking us why people hve it.


As for toast, we just want a reliable recipe which will produce - every time - an even crumb and a very even browning in an electric toaster. 


I'd like to toast in front of our log-burning stove but the heat, with the door open, is so strong that we'd need very long toasting forks and we haven't any.


Perhaps i should post on Freegle ...


Spouse is sleeping in his high-backed armed dining chair after a beautiful meal of pheasant, roast potatoes and parsnips in goose fat, Chantennay carrots,sprouts of course, pigs in blankets, savoury pudding, gravy and pheasant with Christmas pudding and very rich rum sauce. and several wines.


I looked at the washing up and decided to come upstairs to see if anyone had suggested a recipe for toasting bread.


I can wait :-)

KenK's picture
KenK

I just got back from looking up bread sauce.  I would try it if someone served it to me but I don't think I will be making it myself.


This recipe from KA has worked well for me.  http://www.kingarthurflour.com/recipes/our-favorite-sandwich-bread-recipe


I also like the white bread, variation 1, in the BBA.