The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Baking Bread Videos

mcs's picture
mcs

Baking Bread Videos

Hey there everyone.  Well I'm emerging out of hibernation to tell you about my latest project.  Last spring I started working on a couple of instructional baking DVDs but I never finished them before the busy season hit.  Then when I got back to work on them this fall, I decided to re-shoot the whole thing and spend some more time on them. 


Well, I just got finished. 


I had a different focus for each video.  The first DVD is for the baker who reads a recipe and wants to see exactly what the dough is supposed to look like at each stage of the process.  I showcase three recipes and I demonstrate how I work with each of them 'from start to finish'.  Two of the doughs I mix by hand, one with a mixer.  I voice over while I'm working so there's no standing around watching the dough dry.  Anyway, here's a preview:


 


 

The second video focuses on the entire baking bread process from scaling to mixing in more detail - although I include the same recipes for you to try out as the first video, I demonstrate techniques using different doughs like rye, sour white, and baguettes (no recipes for those).  This DVD is more for the baker who already has a favorite baking book and/or recipe, but would like to improve their skills a bit.  You can see that preview here:

 

 

Well, let me know what you think, and if you have any questions regarding them, you can ask right here!

-Mark

If you'd like some more info about the DVDs you can visit our website over here.

proth5's picture
proth5

Although I caught a glimpse of the sheeter in the first clip and just went off into reverie...


I'm glad to see that you got the DVD's done and wish you great luck with them!


(prep monkey) Pat

mcs's picture
mcs

You know, I could point the video camera at the sheeter and just film it for an hour.  That way you could just stare at your screen and drool.  Every once in a while I'd adjust the width on the rollers so you know it's not just a still frame you're looking at.


Take it easy.


-Mark

proth5's picture
proth5

but the doctors here tell me that I need to just let go  of the sheeter obsession.


Rolling pins are fine, rolling pins are fine...

LindyD's picture
LindyD

Hi Mark - they look great.  Question:  in the baking segment quickie,  you move the baked loaves into something that looks like an oven, but can't be.  What is it?


Question #2.  I don't do PayPal.  Check okay by snail-mail?  That second DVD would be a good gift for a friend who is afraid to try something as simple as the ABIF or Lahey no-knead.


Thanks.


Lindy

mcs's picture
mcs

Glad you like the videos. 
I think for question #1, you're talking about the part when I remove the loaves from their pan, put them on a peel, then put them back in the oven?  I do that to dry out the bottoms of them for the last 10 minutes or so of the bake. 


#2 - Yes, snail mail is fine with me. 


-Mark

KenK's picture
KenK

I found the videos on Mark's website to be a tremendous help and plan on buying one or both of the videos.  I figure watching him shape rolls and other things took months off my learning curve.


I covet that roll divider thing.  I never knew such even existed until I saw it in the video.

mcs's picture
mcs

I tried to show a decent amount of repetition in both of the DVDs, but especially the second one.  On DVD#2 there's a section on rolls - bascially uncut for 5 minutes or so where I'm making some PSB rolls at different speeds.  I know when I was learning across the table from someone, I found it helpful to just watch the method and process it in my head.  Then I'd try it, watch it, try it, watch it....Hopefully with the videos you'll get the same feeling.


Yeah, that roll divider's great.  Last Thursday I had 24 dozen rolls to make and it was an enormous time saver.


-Mark

Zalbar's picture
Zalbar

What camera do you use to film, and are there any special lights going when you do? Ever since your very first video I've continuously been amazed and slightly awed at the video quality.

mcs's picture
mcs

The cameras have changed over the past two years.  The first few videos were shot with a Canon SureShot and the last couple with a Panasonic Lumix DMC-TZ5.    The Lumix can shoot in HD and has a very nice Leica lens.  You can see the previews for the DVDs are a lot clearer than the '5 minutes at the Back Home Bakery' video.  Even though they were both with the same camera, the 5 minutes video was a very quick process that I edited an uploaded in an hour, just for fun.  The DVDs I was more careful with the lighting and angles and such.  All except the first video were shot with a tripod, so that helps. 
I've got a decent amount of halogen lighting in the bakery so if I want it bright I turn them all on.  If I want to isolate the view on the table, I only turn those lights on.   One more thing that really helps?  I don't use the zoom at all, digital or optical.   If I want a closeup, I move the camera in close and isolate it so it doesn't shake.


-Mark


http://TheBackHomeBakery.com

ehanner's picture
ehanner

Mark,


Just to let you know, I am very happy with the videos. I watched both from end to end today. As a home baker I have developed some skills over the last few years. A lot of my progress was after watching your early video work. There is just something powerful about seeing a master handle dough. There is so much to be learned by careful observation of your processes. While watching the batard shaping video tonight, I realized you were being much more gentle than I had thought. I'm still working on your baguette shaping method.


Anyway, great job and these are going be well used.


Eric