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Adapting a sourdough recipe to poolish (with new question 12/19)

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Fly's picture
Fly

Adapting a sourdough recipe to poolish (with new question 12/19)

I really want to make these cinnamon rolls but I have not yet managed a successful sourdough starter.  I have been having good results using a 100% poolish and allowing it to ripen overnight; however, I still use a full dose of commercial yeast (minus the miniscule amount in the poolish) for the final dough.  My first thought is to build the dough as described, substituting my ripe poolish for the sourdough in the levain and knocking the yeast down in the final dough to around 1%.  Any advice?


 


 


 


EDIT 12/19:


     So my adjustment to a poolish appears to have worked out (I won't know for certain until tomorrow morning but all looks and smells wonderful).  But I ran into a problem with the "log" portion of the procedure; namely that nothing resembling a log was even remotely possible.  The doung was far to slack and sticky to hold any sort of shape.  I did get the rolls cut and panned but would love to hear others' experience and tips on handling the dough.

flournwater's picture
flournwater

I prefer to use only enough yeast to do the job and avoid usuing more than necessary.  I typically use about 1% yeast for my cinammon rolls.  Works just fine. 

Fly's picture
Fly

bump for new question ;)

flournwater's picture
flournwater

Without knowing the formula you used it's difficult to know exactly why your dough was not firmer, except that it's obviously a factor of hydration.  If you didn't adjust your final dough for the 100% hydration in the poolish you would clearly have a very slack dough.  My cinnamon rolls are typically 52 - 59% hydration, and if I use a poolish I have to factor it's level of hydration into the formula to avoid a slack dough.

Fly's picture
Fly

The link to the recipe is in my original post.

Pjacobs's picture
Pjacobs

Fly. Don"t give up on SD. I have just baked my first loaves of SD bread which I would never have thought possible, given my previous failures. So,with renewed vigor and after watching a video,  I got a 3 quart bowl, and put a half cup of bread flour in it along with a half cup of water. Stir it. Covered the bowl with a single layer of cheese cloth and set it out on the counter for about 7 hours. Then,after I stirred it again, I poured it into a plastic container (about 1 quart size) and added an additonal half cup of flour and a half cup of water and two tablespoons of pineapple juice and stirred well again. The next day, I added a half cup of flour and a half cup of water. six hours later I added another half cup of flour and half cup of water and another tablespoon of pineapple juice. Each day thereafter I poured off all but one cup--more or less-- and added a half cup of flour and half a cup of water. By day four or five it was bubbling and on day eight, I heard a popping sound in the night, and dicovered that the sourdough had risen for the first time and blown the lid off the container. I just kept feeding it twice day, like I mentioned above, and it continued to blow the lid off. I have just moved my starter into a glass jar with a locking lid and that seems to have  solved that problem. And I can now report that the results of my first SD bake were fantastic. My wife and I ate one of the loaves and our neighbor is presently enjoying the other one which I traded for a tin of cookies she brought over. Good luck.


Phil Jacobs