The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

New member from Finland

sadutar's picture
sadutar

New member from Finland

Greetings from Finland. I found this site about a week ago and it's really fascinating, especially when there are so many sourdough fanatics, I mean specialists here. I have only just started baking with my own rye starter couple months ago and only yesterday did it turn out well enough. I'm quite a perfectionist with it. I'll post some pictures as soon as I figure out how. It's a tricky thing to bake with a gas oven, especially the white breads because they don't get the color the same way when the flame is in the bottom of the stove. I have one question to those who bake sour rye bread: how do you bake it so that the crust is hard and tasty and also the crumb is full-baked and NOT STICKY? Somehow my breads are too moist inside to my taste, even if I bake them for two hours...this I just can't figure out.

*satu*

sphealey's picture
sphealey

I will be interested to hear about the home baking situation in Finland.

 

Two questions: what type of oven are you using (and/or is common in your region)? And what temperature are using to bake out the loaf?

 

In order to get a good crust and a crumb that is not too moist/sticky with rye breads, I have found that I need to bake at 250-260 deg.C for 15 minutes and then 200 deg.C for 30 minutes, sometimes finishing up with another 5 minutes at 260-265 using the convection (forced air circulation) setting.

 

I also add steam by putting boiling water in a cast-iron skillet at the bottom of the oven.

 

In order to even out the temperature swings and force heat into the bottom of the loaf I use a baking stone in the oven (a HearthKit in my case, but there are less-expensive solutions).

 

HTH.

 

Steven

sadutar's picture
sadutar

I think the home baking situation in Finland generally isn't so good, people buy their bread in big grocery stores, and the few big bakeries rule the market. But then again, I know many people who do bake at home, even if not regularly. But we get more ready-to-bake-products all the time in the freezer. (I'm heating some carelian pies myself at the moment, shame on me! ;) I have a common gas oven, I think, I've never had one before so I don't know much about them. We don't usually have gas ovens in here, electric ones are more common. This time I baked my bread starting at 250 deg.C, and I gradyally lowed it to 190 deg.C, because that's how it would be in a wood-heated baking oven, where these breads are originally baked in. As I said, I baked this bread for almost two hours, because when I tried it it felt too heavy to be ready. I used to keep a pan of water in the oven but I abandoned it when the bread was always too moist. My oven doesn't have any air-circulation setting, only the one! I'll try the hotter end of baking next time. And here's a picture, if this works.

sphealey's picture
sphealey

If it is a true Northern European rye bread with a rye flour percentage of greater than 33% of the total flour, my understanding is that it will never rise very much. The rye flour is too sticky and the amount of gluten too low to generate the rising cycle.

 

I intend to test this for the end-of-year party in my son's German class by baking the Traditional Pumpernickel from _Bread Alone_. I will compare my results to yours!

 

If you can find a copy of Rose Levy Beranbaum's _The Bread Bible_(ISBN 0393057941) you might want to try her "Levy's Real Jewish Rye" which is a yeasted low-fraction rye and see if you can get that to work for a comparision. It tastes quite good also (lately I have been omitting the sugar and malt from the sponge and like it even more).

 

sph

sadutar's picture
sadutar

It's nothing but rye, water and salt :) The best rye bread I know doesn't have anything else and I'd like to do the same at home. The breads I've made this far are ok but as I said I'm a perfectionist with this project. But it does rise! at least the dough I've made has risen to a double before I bake it. The breads in the baking tin are the best because they keep the form and dont crack so much.

 

I'll see if I can find the book here.

 

*satu*

andrew_l's picture
andrew_l

Sadutar, Dan Lepard's book ( it's called "The Fresh Loaf") has a recipe for Rye bread from a Scandinavian baker, where half of the rye flour is mixed with boiling water before it is used. This increases the ability of the flour to rise and looks a very interesting recipe. Not one I've tried yet...
I'm not sure, with copyright law, if I'm allowed to post the recipe here? But I could surely copy out the method, if you are interested, and post that....

Andrew

sadutar's picture
sadutar

Of course I'm interested, sounds nice!

Floydm's picture
Floydm

Dan Lepard's book ( it's called "The Fresh Loaf")

You mean The Handmade Loaf? I did a bit of poking around a couple of years ago when I picked this domain and didn't think there were any baking books or other sites with the same title. The Handmade Loaf is a great book.

My understanding is that recipes cannot be copyrighted, at least in the US, though the presentation, images, and exact language used to describe them can. So giving summaries of a recipe should be fine, particularly if you credit the original author, though copying a chapter out of his book would not.

I certainly would encourage people to visit Dan Lepard's site or check out his books, if you haven't already. He's a great baker.

cuorechen's picture
cuorechen

life is as firm and chewy as a good bread crumb
Dear all
I am a new born member here and I've learned how to bake what so called artisan bread for about 8 years. I am a Chinese. However, to me, everything about bread is totally fascinating. I learned all the techniques from the 22 bread books I collected.
I make my own levain here. It smells stink at first and after its turning to be a dough. It smells so sweet. The result is wonderful. Strong crust and sweet crumb. Would love to discuss breads w/ people who share the same spirit.
Cory Chen