The Fresh Loaf

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Sourdough Stollen Recipe anyone?

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Dani Battle's picture
Dani Battle

Sourdough Stollen Recipe anyone?

Anyone up for sharing one???


I am a Brit in the USA (16 yrs now...where did the time go?), and I ALWAYS cook from my Delia Smith's Christmas book for the holidays. I am a keen sourdough baker, and would love to translate a stollen recipe into something that will utilize my starter, and maybe make a stollen-roll-type-thing this year.


I am not precise when I feed my starter, so I need some help in working out how much to use, how long to proof. (That almond paste is EXPENSIVE, so I don't want to waste too much on failed attempts if I can help it).


Thanks - DaniB

AnnaInMD's picture
AnnaInMD

Being from the former East Germany, Christmas Stollen was always big on the list. As you might know, it is a sweet yeast dough with raisins, candied fruits and nuts, then finished with melted butter and lots of confectioners sugar.  I am not sure that sourdough would lend itself to the Stollen's particular taste.


Folks have used left-over starter for pancakes, pizza dough, and dinner rolls.


Have fun:)


Anna

AnnaInMD's picture
AnnaInMD

we didn't add marzipan to the dough.  Recently, I have seen marzipan mentioned, and if I were to include it, I would chop it up rather than use as a roll to be a bit more authentic and to incorporate in the entire dough. 

clazar123's picture
clazar123

I don't have a recipe for you but I think sourdough starter would work just fine as long as you don't process it for the sour tang. I use my starter as regular yeast so my bread turns out with absolutely no sour tang but as a flavorful, regular bread. I use about 1/2 c of a "probably" 100% by weight hydration-it is about the consistency of a thick pancake batter-for every loaf(which has about 3 c flour). When I'm adapting a recipe I reduce the flour by about 1/4-1/2 c and adjust the water by the feel of the dough.


My suggestion is to use your regular recipe,reduce the water and flour by a bit,use 1/2 c  active, "100% by weight" starter per 3 c flour,reduce the yeast to 1/4-1 tsp per loaf depending on how fast a rise time you have to work in. This is kind of a "seat of the pants" adaptation.


What is your regular recipe? I don't use the almond paste so I'm curious to see how it is used. I believe my stollen recipe used blanched almonds and almond flavor.Haven't made it in a long time.

Dani Battle's picture
Dani Battle

Hi Clazar123


I make a version of this stollen...


http://www.deliaonline.com/recipes/cuisine/european/english/stollen.html


...depending on what I can get my hands on in the USA as far as dried fruit and uncolored candied peel (I have a son with food dye allergies). I don't like marzipan as such, but the Odense Almond paste is DIVINE!  I am going to try making a version of this bread that will feed 2 people each roll, as there are only 3 of us here for Xmas and a whole loaf at once is over-kill. I make the bread, freeze it, then bake it that morning or the night before I want it.


 


Thanks for the recipe conversion suggestions, I will start a batch of dough tonight and see how I get on. Also, how do you think the eggs will change the rising capacity of the dough?  I was going to add some baking soda to the dough to cut the sourness a bit, and maybe an additional tablespoon of sugar...we'll see :)

clazar123's picture
clazar123

Does your sourdough starter really make your bread that sour/tangy? Mine only does that if I do a prolonged rise in a warm environment. I can't imagine it would hurt to add the soda-just make sure it is WELL mixed in.


When I make bread on Saturdays, it can take anywhere from 3-6 hours to raise double (even with eggs) but ,remember, I am using some commercial yeast as well as my sourdough. I do that to shorten the rise time and still have the complex flavor that even mild sourdough imparts.But it is true that enriching the dough with eggs,fats and sugars can increase the rise time.


If I don't use any commercial yeast, it can take as long as overnight (12-16h) at this time of year (the house is about 60F).But it doesn't develop any tang.... because of the coolness?


Where do you get non-dyed dried fruit and peel? I just don''t like violently colored food-it seems unhealthful. I've gone to using craisins and golden raisins.


I just looked at your recipe link.Here are a few suggestions:


Make just the dough without the expensive fruit/paste added to see how it turns out. It will give you an idea of the crumb texture with the new recipe. It may be a new staple!


Why not just leave out the lemon juice when using sourdough-it just adds more tang? But leave the lemon zest for flavor or increase it just slightly.


Whatever you do, make sure you write down the recipe you are developing for next year. Then add notes when you eat the final product. I do this all the time.


Have fun and Happy Holidays!